Etymology
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Hunan 

Chinese province, literally "south of the lake" (Dongting), from hu "lake" + nan "south." Related: Hunanese.

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Sussex 

county in southeast England, from Old English Suþ Seaxe "(land of the) South Saxons;" see south + Saxon.

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Soweto (n.)

black African community outside Johannesburg, South Africa, formed from first letters of South Western Townships. Related: Sowetan.

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Canberra 

capital of Australia, 1826, from Aborigine nganbirra "meeting place."

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antarctic (adj.)

late 14c., antartyk "opposite to the north pole" (adj.), from Old French antartique, from Medieval Latin antarcticus, from Greek antarktikos "opposite the north," from anti- "opposite" (see anti-) + arktikos "arctic" (see arctic).

The first -c- ceased to be pronounced in Medieval Latin and was dropped in Old French. Modern English restores it in spelling from 17c. Also from late 14c. as a noun (with capital A-), "region around the South pole of the sky or the southern regions of the Earth."

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kopje (n.)

small hill in South Africa, 1852, earlier koppie (1848), from South African Dutch, diminutive of kop "hill; head" (see kop).

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Afrikaans (n.)

"the Germanic language of South Africa, the Dutch language as spoken in South Africa," 1892, from Dutch Afrikaansch "Africanish" (see Afrikander). Also known as South African Dutch.

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capitalization (n.)

1860, "act of converting (assets) to capital," noun of action from capitalize in the financial sense. The meaning "act of writing or printing in capital letters" is recorded from 1847, from the writing sense.

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Pyongyang 

North Korean capital, from Korean p'yong "flat" + yang "land."

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Kathmandu 

Nepalese capital, from Nepalese Kathmandu, from kath "wooden" + mandu "temple."

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