Etymology
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trilateral (adj.)

1650s, from Late Latin trilaterus "three-sided;" see tri- + lateral. The Trilateral Commission (representing Japan, the U.S., and Europe) was founded 1973. Related: Trilateralism; trilaterally.

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Nanking 

city in China, literally "southern capital," from Chinese nan "south" + jing "capital."

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Kobe 

type of fine beef, 1894, named for the region in Japan where it is raised, from Japanese ko "god" + he "house."

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anime (n.)

c. 1985, Japanese for "animation," a word that seems to have arisen in Japan in the 1970s, said in Japanese sources to be an abbreviation of English animation.

Manga (q.v.) is Japanese for "comic book, graphic novel," but anime largely are based on manga and until 1970s, anime were known in Japan as manga eiga or "TV manga." The two terms are somewhat confused in English.

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honcho (n.)

1947, American English, "officer in charge," from Japanese hancho "group leader," from han "corps, squad" + cho "head, chief." Picked up by U.S. servicemen in Japan and Korea, 1947-1953.

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kami (n.)

a Japanese word meaning "superior, lord," a title of the gods of Japan, also given to governors. The word was chosen by Japanese converts and Protestant missionaries to refer to the Christian God. Attested in English from 1610s.

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Canberra 

capital of Australia, 1826, from Aborigine nganbirra "meeting place."

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Hiroshima 

city in Japan, literally "broad island," from Japanese hiro "broad" + shima "island." So called in reference to its situation on the delta of the Ota River.

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capitalization (n.)

1860, "act of converting (assets) to capital," noun of action from capitalize in the financial sense. The meaning "act of writing or printing in capital letters" is recorded from 1847, from the writing sense.

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Pyongyang 

North Korean capital, from Korean p'yong "flat" + yang "land."

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