Etymology
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educability (n.)

"capability of being educated; capacity for receiving instruction," 1821, in phrenology; see educable + -ity.

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paramedical (adj.)

"related to medicine in an auxiliary capacity," 1908, from para- (1) "subsidiary" + medical (adj.).

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modulation (n.)

late 14c., modulacioun, "act of singing or making music, harmony," from Old French modulation "act of making music" (14c.) and directly from Latin modulationem (nominative modulatio) "rhythmical measure, singing and playing, melody," noun of action from past-participle stem of modulari "regulate, measure off properly, measure rhythmically; play, play upon," from modulus "small measure," diminutive of modus "measure, manner" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures"). Meaning "act of regulating according to measure or proportion" is from 1530s. Musical sense of "action or process of changing from one key to another" is by 1690s.

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incommensurate (adj.)
"not of equal measure; not having a common measure," 1640s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + commensurate.
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incommensurable (adj.)

"having no common measure," 1550s, from French incommensurable (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin incommensurabilis, from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + Late Latin commensurabilis, from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + mensurabilis "measurable," from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure" (from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure"). Related: Incommensurably.

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eyesight (n.)

"sense of sight, capacity for seeing," c. 1200, from eye (n.) + sight (n.).

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commensurate (adj.)

1640s, "corresponding in amount, degree, or magnitude," also "of equal size" (on the notion of "having the same boundaries"), from Late Latin commensuratus, from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + Late Latin mensuratus, past participle of mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure." Meaning "reducible to a common measure, commensurable" is from 1680s. Related: Commensurately.

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measurable (adj.)

c. 1300, "moderate, modest, discreet" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French mesurable "restrained, moderate, sensible; restricted," from Late Latin mensurabilis, from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure." Meaning "that can be measured" is from mid-14c. Related: Measurably.

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modicum (n.)
"small quantity or portion," late 15c., Scottish, from Latin modicum "a little," noun use of neuter of modicus "moderate, having a proper measure; ordinary, scanty, small, few," from modus "measure, extent, quantity; proper measure," from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures."
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mismeasure (v.)

"measure incorrectly or inaccurately," 1742, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + measure (v.). Related: Mismeasured; mismeasuring; mismeasurement (1813).

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