Etymology
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bludgeon (n.)

"short club, heavy stick with one end thicker than the other," 1730, of unknown origin.

A plausible conjecture connects it with D[utch] blusden, blusten bruise, beat .... The E. word, if from this source may have been introduced as a cant term in the Elizabethan period, along with many other cant terms from the D[utch] which never, or not until much later, emerged in literary use. [Century Dictionary]
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shoplift (v.)

also shop-lift, "steal from a shop while posing as a customer," 1711, a back-formation from shoplifting. Earlier it was rogue's cant for "a shoplifter" (1660s). Related: Shoplifted.

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kid (v.)

"tease playfully," 1839, earlier, in thieves' cant, "to coax, wheedle, hoax" (1811), probably from kid (n.), via notion of "treat as a child, make a kid of." Related: Kidded; kidding. Colloquial interjection no kidding! "that's the truth" is from 1914.

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shiv (n.)

"a razor," by 1915, possibly 1890s or earlier in underworld slang, a variant (based on pronunciation) of chive, thieves' cant word for "knife" (1670s), which is of unknown origin. Often said to be a Romany (Gypsy) word, from chivomengro "knife." 

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slum (n.)

1845, from back slum "dirty back alley of a city, street of poor or low people" (1825), originally a slang or cant word meaning "room," especially "back room" (1812), of unknown origin. Related: slums. Slumscape is from 1947.

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stroll (v.)

c. 1600, a cant word introduced from the Continent, probably from dialectal German strollen, variant of Swiss German strolchen "to stroll about, loaf," from Strolch "vagabond, vagrant," also "fortuneteller," perhaps from Italian astrologo "astrologer." Related: Strolled; strolling.

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arbor vitae (n.)

also arbor-vitae, type of evergreen shrub, 1660s, name given by French physician and botanist Charles de Lécluse, Latin, literally "tree of life;" see arbor (n.2) + vital. Also used in late 18c. rogue's slang as a cant word for "penis."

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peavey (n.)

"cant-hook having a strong spike at the end," used by lumbermen, 1878, said to be named for a John Peavey, blacksmith in Bolivar, N.Y., who supposedly invented it c. 1872. Other sources ascribe it to a Joseph Peavey of Stillwater, Maine, and give a date of 1858.

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snip (n.)

1550s, "small piece of cut-out cloth," probably from Dutch or Low German snippen "to snip, shred," of imitative origin. Meaning "cut made by scissors" is from 1590s. As a nickname or cant word for a tailor, 1590s. Snip-snap-snorum, the card game, is 1755, from Low German.

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kidnap (v.)

1680s, thieves' cant, a compound of kid (n.) "child" and nap (v.) "snatch away," which probably is a variant of nab (v.). Perhaps a back-formation from kidnapper, which is recorded earlier. Originally "to steal children to provide servants and laborers in the American colonies." Related: Kidnapped; kidnapping.

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