Etymology
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run-down (adj.)

1866, of persons, "to have the health or strength reduced," from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + down (adv.). From 1896 of places, "dilapidated, shabby, seedy;" by 1894 of clocks, etc., "completely unwound." The earliest sense is "oppressed" (1680s). Compare rundown (n.).

The verbal phrase run down as "have the motive power exhausted" (of clocks, etc.) is by 1761; of persons, etc., "become weak or exhausted," by 1828. To run (something or someone) down "disparage, abuse" is by 1660s. 

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low-down (adj.)
also low down, lowdown, "vulgar, far down the social scale," 1888, from low (adj.) + down (adv.). Earlier it had meant "humble" (1540s). As a noun, 1915, from the adjective, American English. Low-downer was late 19c. American English colloquial for "poor white; rude, mean person."
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lie-down (n.)
period of rest reclining, 1840, from the verbal phrase (attested from c. 1200); see lie (v.2) + down (adv.).
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tumble-down (adj.)
1791, originally "habitually falling down" and used first of horses, from tumble (v.) + down (adv.); in reference to buildings, "in a dilapidated condition," from 1818.
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up-and-down (adj.)
1610s, from adverbial phrase up and down (c. 1200); see up (adv.) + down (adv.).
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hand-me-down (adj.)
1826, from the verbal phrase; see hand (v.). As a noun from 1874.
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calmly (adv.)
"quietly, peacefully," 1590s, from calm (adj.) + -ly (2).
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Honolulu 
chief city of Hawaii, from Hawaiian hono "port" + lulu "calm."
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becalm (v.)
1550s in nautical use, "deprive a ship of wind," from be- + calm. Meaning "make calm or still" is from 1610s. Related: Becalmed; becalming.
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placid (adj.)

"gentle, quiet, undisturbed, serene, calm," 1620s, from French placide (15c.) and directly from Latin placidus "pleasing, peaceful, quiet, gentle, still, calm," from placere "to please" (see please). Related: Placidly; placidness.

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