Etymology
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knub (n.)
"small lump, butt-end or piece," 1560s, probably cognate with Low German knubbe "knot, knob," Danish knub "block, log, stump" (see knob).
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scepter (n.)

"staff of office peculiar to royalty or independent sovereignty," c. 1300, ceptre, from Old French ceptre, sceptre (12c.) and directly from Latin sceptrum "royal staff," from Greek skēptron "staff to lean on," in a Persian and Asian context, "royal scepter," in transferred use, "royalty," from root of skeptein "'to support oneself, lean; pretend something, use as a pretention." Beekes has this from a root *skap- (perhaps non-Indo-European) and compares Latin scapus "shaft, stalk," Albanian shkop "stick, scepter," Old High German skaft, Old Norse skapt, Old English sceaft "shaft, spear, lance" (see shaft (n.1)).

The verb meaning "to furnish with a scepter" is from 1520s; hence "invest with royal authority." Related: Sceptred.

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limber (n.)
"detachable forepart of a field-gun carriage," 1620s, alteration of Middle English lymer (early 15c.), earlier lymon (c. 1400), probably from Old French limon "shaft," a word perhaps of Celtic origin, or possibly from Germanic and related to limb (n.1). Compare related Spanish limon "shaft," leman "helmsman."

The nautical limber "hole cut in floor timbers to allow water to drain" (1620s), however, appears to be unrelated; perhaps from French lumière "hole, perforation," literally "light."
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buttery (n.)
"place for storing liquor," also "room where provisions are laid up" (late 14c.), from Old French boterie, from Late Latin botaria, from bota, variant of butta "cask, bottle;" see butt (n.2) + -ery.
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putt (v.)

1510s, Scottish, "to push, shove, butt" (a sense now obsolete), a special use and pronunciation of put (v.). Golfing sense of "strike the ball gently and carefully" is from 1743. Meaning "to throw" (a stone, as a demonstration of strength) in this spelling is from 1724; this also is the putt in shot putting. Related: Putted; putting.

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buttocks (n.)
"the two protuberances which form the rump in men and animals," c. 1300, probably from Old English buttuc "end, short piece of land," from Proto-Germanic *butaz, from PIE root *bhau- "to strike," thus related to butt (n.1).
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scuttlebutt (n.)

also scuttle-butt, 1805, "cask of drinking water kept on a ship's deck, having a hole (scuttle) cut in it for a cup or dipper," from scuttle "opening in a ship's deck" (see scuttle (v.2)) + butt (n.2) "barrel." Earlier scuttle cask (1777). The slang meaning "rumor, gossip" is recorded by 1901, traditionally said to be from the sailors' custom of gathering around the scuttlebutt to gossip while at sea. Compare water-cooler, figurative for "workplace gossip" in mid-20c.

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*bhau- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to strike."

It forms all or part of: abut; baste (v.3) "beat with a stick, thrash;" battledore; beat; beetle (n.2) "heavy wooden mallet;" botony; boutonniere; butt (n.1) "thick end;" butt (v.) "strike with the head;" buttocks; button; buttress; confute; halibut; rebut; refute; sackbut; turbot.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin *futare "to beat" (in compounds); Old English beadu "battle," beatan "to beat," bytl "hammer, mallet."
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scopa (n.)

tuft of hairs on a bee's leg, 1802, from Latin scopae (plural) "twigs, shoots; a broom, brush," which is related to scapus "shaft," which perhaps is cognate with Greek skapos "staff," skēptron "staff, scepter" (see scepter). 

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halibut (n.)
large flatfish, early 15c., perhaps from hali "holy" (see holy) + butte "flatfish" (see butt (n.4)). Supposedly so called from its being eaten on holy days (compare cognate Dutch heilbot, Low German heilbutt, Swedish helgeflundra, Danish helleflynder).
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