Etymology
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church (v.)
"to bring or lead to church," mid-14c., from church (n.). Related: Churched.
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educe (v.)
early 15c., in the literal sense, "to draw out, extract; branch out," from Latin educere "to lead out, bring out" (troops, ships, etc.; see educate). Meaning "bring into view or operation" is from c. 1600. Meaning "to draw a conclusion from data" is from 1837.
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aggregate (adj.)

c. 1400, from Latin aggregatus "associated, united," past participle of aggregare "add to (a flock), lead to a flock, bring together (in a flock)," figuratively "attach, join, include; collect, bring together," from ad "to" (see ad-) + gregare "to collect into a flock, gather," from grex (genitive gregis) "a flock,"from PIE root *ger- "to gather."

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maturate (v.)

1540s, (transitive) "to bring to maturity," back-formation from maturation. Intransitive sense of "to ripen" is by 1620s. Related: Maturated; maturating.

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nurture (v.)

c. 1400, norturen, "to bring up, rear" (a child), from nurture (n.). Related: Nurtured; nurturing.

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suggest (v.)
1520s, "place before another's mind; put forward a proposition," from Latin suggestus, past participle of suggerere "bring up, bring under, lay beneath; furnish, afford, supply; prompt" (see suggestion). Meaning "to act so as to call up the idea of (something else)" is from 1709. Related: Suggested; suggesting.
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realize (v.)

1610s, "bring into existence, make or cause to become real," also "exhibit the actual existence of," from French réaliser "make real" (16c.), from real "actual" (see real (adj.)). The sense of "understand clearly, comprehend the reality of" is recorded by 1775. Sense of "obtain, amass, bring or get into actual possession" (money, profit, etc.) is from 1753. Related: Realized; realizing.

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support (v.)

late 14c., "to aid," also "to hold up, prop up, put up with, tolerate," from Old French suporter "to bear, endure, sustain, support" (14c.), from Latin supportare "convey, carry, bring up, bring forward," from assimilated form of sub "up from under" (see sub-) + portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." Related: Supported; supporting.

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harmonize (v.)
late 15c., "play or sing in harmony," from French harmoniser (15c.), from Old French harmonie (see harmony). Meaning "be in harmony (with), go well together" is from 1620s. Transitive sense "bring into harmony" is from 1700; figurative sense "bring into agreement" is from 1767. Meaning "add harmony to (a melody)" is from 1790. Related: Harmonized; harmonizing.
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reacquaint (v.)

also re-acquaint, "make acquainted again, bring back into acquaintance," 1640s, from re- + acquaint. Related: Reacquainted; reacquainting.

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