Etymology
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blow-gun (n.)
"pipe or tube through which missiles are blown by the breath," 1799, from blow (v.1) + gun (n.).
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animation (n.)

1590s, "action of imparting life" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin animationem (nominative animatio) "an animating," noun of action from past-participle stem of animare "give breath to," also "to endow with a particular spirit, to give courage to, enliven," from anima "life, breath" (from PIE root *ane- "to breathe"). Meaning "vitality, appearance of activity or life" is from 1610s (the sense in suspended animation). Cinematographic sense, "production of moving cartoon pictures" is from 1912.

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pneumato- 
before vowels pneumat-, word-forming element meaning "wind, air, spirit, presence of air," from Greek pneuma (genitive pneumatos) "the wind," also "breath" (see pneuma).
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gasp (n.)
1570s, from gasp (v.). Earliest attested use is in the phrase last gasp "final breath before dying." To gasp up the ghost "die" is attested from 1530s.
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aromatize (v.)
"to perfume, render aromatic" (of medicines, the breath), early 15c., from Latin aromatizare, from Greek aromatizein "to spice," from aromat-, stem of aroma "seasoning, sweet spice," which is of unknown origin.
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asthmatic (adj.)
"pertaining to or afflicted with asthma," 1540s, from Latin asthmaticus, from Greek asthmatikos, from asthma "shortness of breath" (see asthma). Noun meaning "person with asthma" is recorded from 1610s.
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animate (v.)

1530s, "to fill with boldness or courage," from Latin animatus past participle of animare "give breath to," also "to endow with a particular spirit, to give courage to, enliven," from anima "life, breath" (see animus). Sense of "give natural life to" in English attested from 1742. Meaning "render in moving pictures" is by 1888 (animated pictures); in reference to cinematic cartoons by 1911. Related: Animated; animating.

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Abel 
masc. proper name, in the Old Testament the second son of Adam and Eve, from Hebrew Hebhel, literally "breath," also "vanity;" "so called from his short life and sudden death" [Thayer].
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baited (adj.)
c. 1600, "furnished with bait," past-participle adjective from bait (v.2). Hence, in a figurative sense, "exciting, alluring" (1650s). For bated breath see bate (v.1).
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sob (v.)
c. 1200, "to cry with short breaths," probably of imitative origin, related to Old English seofian "to lament," Old High German sufan "to draw breath," West Frisian sobje "to suck." Related: Sobbed; sobbing.
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