Etymology
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self-portrait (n.)

"a portrait of oneself, by oneself," 1821, from self- + portrait, translating German Selbstbildnis.

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submit (v.)
late 14c., "to place (oneself) under the control of another, to yield oneself," from Latin submittere "to yield, lower, let down, put under, reduce," from sub "under" (see sub-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Transitive sense of "refer to another for consideration" first recorded 1550s. Related: Submitted; submitting.
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*mregh-u- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "short."

It forms all or part of: abbreviate; abbreviation; abridge; amphibrach; brace; bracelet; brachio-; brachiopod; brachiosaurus; brachy-; brassiere; breviary; brevity; brief; brumal; brume; embrace; merry; mirth; pretzel; vambrace.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek brakhys "short;" Latin brevis "short, low, little, shallow;" Old Church Slavonic bruzeja "shallow places, shoals;" Gothic gamaurgjan "to shorten."
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brasserie (n.)

"beer saloon in which food is served," 1864, from French brasserie "beer-garden attached to a brewery," from brasser "to brew," from Latin brace "grain used to prepare malt," said by Pliny to be a Celtic word (compare Welsh brag "malt").

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crampon (n.)

c. 1300, "metal bar bent at the ends for fastening," from Old French crampoun "cramp, brace, staple" (13c.), from Germanic (see cramp (n.1); also compare cramp (n.2)). As "apparatus used in the raising of heavy weights," mid-15c. By 1789 as "plate set with spikes, fastened to the foot to assist in walking on ice or climbing rock."

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self-help (n.)

1831, "working for oneself without assistance from others," from self- + help (n.). Apparently coined by Carlyle. The British Self-Help Emigration Society is attested from 1887.

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strut (n.)
"supporting brace," 1580s, perhaps from strut (v.), or a cognate word in Scandinavian (compare Norwegian strut "a spout, nozzle") or Low German (compare Low German strutt "rigid"); ultimately from Proto-Germanic *strutoz-, from root *strut- (see strut (v.)).
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self-deception (n.)

"deception concerning oneself, act of deceiving oneself," 1670s, from self- + deception. Also self-deceit (1670s). Related: Self-deceived.

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gear (v.)
c. 1200, "to equip oneself for fighting; to dress," probably from gear (n.) or from the verb in Old Norse. Mechanical meaning "put (machinery) in gear" is from 1851. Related: Geared; gearing.
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self-sufficient (adj.)

"able to supply one's own needs, capable of fulfilling one's own desires without aid of others," 1580s, from self- + sufficient. Related: Self-sufficiently. Self-sufficing (1680s) is properly "sufficient for oneself."

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