Etymology
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bowshot (n.)
also bow-shot, "distance traversed by an arrow in its flight from a bow," c. 1300, from bow (n.1) + shot (n.).
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crossbow (n.)

also cross-bow, "missile-throwing weapon consisting of a bow fixed athwart a stock," mid-15c., from cross (n.) + bow (n.1). Unknown to the ancients but common in Europe in the Middle Ages.

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ligament (n.)

band of tough tissue binding bones, late 14c., from Latin ligamentum "a band, bandage, tie, ligature," from ligare "to bind, tie," from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind." Related: Ligamental; ligamentous; ligamentary.

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bowhead (n.)
also bow-head, type of Arctic whale, 1853, from bow (n.1) + head (n.). So called for its shape.
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longbow (n.)
also long-bow, the bow of war and chase in medieval Europe and the characteristic weapon of the English soldiery, only gradually superseded by firearms; late 14c., from long (adj.) + bow (n.1). Distinguished from the crossbow, but especially of bows five feet or longer.
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legato (adv.)

in music, "smoothly, without intervals," 1811, from Italian legato, literally "bound," past participle of legare, from Latin ligare "tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). Related: Legatissimo.

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bowsprit (n.)
"large spar projecting forward from the bow of a ship," late 13c., probably from Middle Low German bochspret, from boch "bow of a ship" (see bow (n.2)) + spret "pole" (compare Old English spreot "pole," Dutch spriet "spear;" see sprit). The variation in early forms (including boltsprit, bolesprit, boresprit) suggests a non-native word. French beaupre is a Dutch loan word.
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lien (n.)

"right to hold property of another until debt is paid," 1530s, from French lien "a band or tie" (12c.), from Latin ligamen "bond," from ligare "to bind, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). The word was in Middle English in the literal sense "a bond, fetter," also figuratively, "moral restraint."

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bowman (n.)
"fighting man armed with a bow," late 13c.; as a surname early 13c., from bow (n.1) + man (n.). Bowman's capsule (1882) was named for English surgeon William Bowman (1816-1892).
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alloy (v.)

c. 1400, "mix (a metal) with a baser metal," from Old French aloiier, aliier "assemble, join," from Latin alligare "bind to, tie to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ligare "to bind, bind one thing to another, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). In figurative use often implying debasement or reduction. The meaning "mix any two metals" without reference to values is from 1822. Related: Alloyed; alloying.

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