Etymology
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rand (n.)

1839 in South African English, rant, "rocky ridge overlooking a river valley," from Afrikaans, from Dutch rand "edge, margin, rim," from Proto-Germanic *randaz "edge, rim, crust" (source also of Old English rand "brink, bank," Old High German rant "border or rim of a shield," German Rand "edge, border, margin," Old Norse rönd "shield-rim, shield," Swedish rand "stripe, edge, verge").

As a unit of currency, adopted by the Republic of South Africa in 1961 (see Krugerrand). Johnson's dictionary has rand "Border; seam: as the rand of a woman's shoe." The Old English cognate survived into Middle English as rand "strip or border of land."

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roadside (n.)

"the side or border of a road," 1744, from road (n.) + side (n.). As an adjective by 1810.

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edged (adj.)

1590s, "having a sharp edge;" 1690s, "having a hem or border," past-participle adjective from edge (v.).

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outskirt (n.)

"outer border, section or part that 'skirts' along the edge or boundary," 1590s, from out- + skirt (n.) in its secondary sense of "border, boundary, outlying part" (late 15c.; in plural form skirts by 1570s). Now only in the plural, outskirts; originally in Spenser, and singular.

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escallop (n.)

"scallop shell," also "edge or border cut in the shape of scallops," late 15c., in plural, escalloppys, from Old French escalope, eschalope "shell (of a nut), carapace," from a Germanic source (see scallop). For initial e-, see e-. As a verb from c. 1600 in escalloped "having the border or edge cut out in scallops."

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coaming (n.)

1610s, nautical, "raised border or edge of a hatch" (to prevent water on deck from running below), of unknown origin.

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skirt (v.)

c. 1600, "to border, form the edge of," from skirt (n.). The meaning "to pass along the edge" is from 1620s. Related: Skirted; skirting.

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Klamath 

native people of the Oregon-California border region, 1826, from Southern Chinookan /tlamatl/, literally "they of the (Klamath) river," from /-matl/ "river."

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door-strip (n.)

"border or weather-guard affixed to the edge of a door, fitting tightly against the casing when it is closed," 1849, from door + strip (n.).

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fimbria (n.)

"a fringing filament," from Late Latin fimbria (sing.), from Latin fimbriae (pl.), "fringe, border, threads." Related: Fimbriated (late 15c.); fimbrial.

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