Etymology
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bookmaker (n.)
also book-maker, 1510s, "printer and binder of books," from book (n.) + agent noun from make (v.). The wagering sense "professional bettor" is from 1862. Related: Book-making (late 15c., betting sense 1824).
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songbook (n.)
Old English sangboc "church service book;" see song (n.) + book (n.). Meaning "collection of songs bound in a book" is from late 15c.
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bookish (adj.)
1560s, "given to reading, fond of books," from book (n.) + -ish. From 1590s in the sense of "overly studious, acquainted with books only." Related: Bookishly; bookishness.
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passbook (n.)

also pass-book, "a bank-book," 1828, from pass (v.) + book (n.); apparently the notion is of the document "passing" between the bank and the customer.

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chap-book (n.)

also chapbook, 1812, from chap, short for chapman, so called because chapmen once sold such books.

One of a class of tracts upon homely and miscellaneous subjects which at one time formed the chief popular literature of Great Britain and the American colonies. They consisted of lives of heroes, martyrs, and wonderful personages, stories of roguery and broad humor, of giants, ghosts, witches, and dreams, histories in verse, songs and ballads, theological tracts, etc. They emanated principally from the provincial press, and were hawked about the country by chapmen or peddlers. [Century Dictionary] 
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Domesday book 

1178 in Anglo-Latin, the popular name of Great Inquisition or Survey (1086), a digest in Anglo-French of a survey of England undertaken at the order of William the Conqueror to inventory his new domain, from Middle English domes, genitive of dom "day of judgment" (see doom (n.)). "The booke ... to be called Domesday, bicause (as Mathew Parise saith) it spared no man, but iudged all men indifferently." [William Lambarde, "A Perambulation of Kent," 1570]

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red book (n.)

from late 15c. in reference to various important medieval books with red covers; as "The Peerage," 1788; as "book containing the names of all persons in the service of the state,"  1800. Mao's Little Red Book, containing his expressions and dictums, is attested in English by that name from 1967.

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overbook (v.)

"to sell more tickets than there are seats," by 1861, from over- + book (v.); originally in reference to coaches. Related: Overbooked; overbooking.

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playbook (n.)

also play-book, 1530s, "book of stage plays," from play (n.) + book (n.). From 1690s as "book containing material for amusement," especially "a picture book for children." Meaning "book of football plays" recorded from 1965.

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scrapbook (n.)
also scrap-book, 1821, from scrap (n.1) + book (n.). As a verb, by 1879. Related: Scrapbooked; scrapbooking.
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