Etymology
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fervent (adj.)
mid-14c., from Old French fervent "fervent, ardent" (12c.), from Latin ferventem (nominative fervens) "boiling, hot, glowing," figuratively "violent, impetuous, furious," present participle of fervere "to boil, glow," from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn." The figurative sense of "impassioned" is first attested c. 1400. Related: Fervency; fervently.
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ferment (v.)
late 14c. (intransitive), from Old French fermenter (13c.) and directly from Latin fermentare "to leaven, cause to rise or ferment," from fermentum "substance causing fermentation, leaven, drink made of fermented barley," perhaps contracted from *fervimentum, from root of fervere "to boil, seethe" (from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn"). Transitive use from 1670s. Figurative use from 1650s. Related: Fermented; fermenting.
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potwalloper (n.)

also pot-walloper, 1725, "one who boils in a pot," hence "one who prepares his own food," a vulgar alteration of pot-waller (1701), from wall "to boil, from a dialectal survival of Old English weallan "to boil, bubble up" (see well (v.)). The word took on a political association in debates over voting reform in early 19c. England. 

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yeast (n.)
Old English gist "yeast, froth," from Proto-Germanic *jest- (source also of Old Norse jastr, Swedish jäst, Middle High German gest, German Gischt "foam, froth," Old High German jesan, German gären "to ferment"), from PIE root *yes- "to boil, foam, froth" (source also of Sanskrit yasyati "boils, seethes," Greek zein "to boil," Welsh ias "seething, foaming").
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foam (v.)
Old English famgian "to emit foam, to boil," from the source of foam (n.). Sense of "become foamy, to froth" is from late 14c. Transitive sense is from 1725. Related: Foamed; foaming.
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ebullience (n.)
1749, from Latin ebullientem (nominative ebulliens) "a boiling, a bursting forth, overflow," present participle of ebullire "to boil over" (see ebullient). Related: Ebulliency (1670s), ebullition (c. 1400).
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strudel (n.)
kind of Austrian pastry, 1893, from German Strudel, literally "eddy, whirlpool," from Old High German stredan "to bubble, boil, whirl, eddy," from PIE verbal stem *ser- "to flow" (see serum).
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well (v.)

"to spring, rise, gush," Old English wiellan (Anglian wællan), causative of weallan "to boil, bubble up, rise (in reference to a river)" (class VII strong verb; past tense weoll, past participle weallen), from Proto-Germanic *wellanan "to roll" (source also of Old Saxon wallan, Old Norse vella, Old Frisian walla, Old High German wallan, German wallen, Gothic wulan "to bubble, boil"), from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve," on notion of "roiling or bubbling water."

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decoct (v.)

early 15c., "prepare by boiling," from Latin decoctus, past participle of decoquere "to boil down," from de "down" (see de-) + coquere "to cook" (from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen"). Related: Decocted; decocting.

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weld (v.)
1590s, "unite or consolidate by hammering or compression, often after softening by heating," alteration of well (v.) "to boil, rise;" influenced by past participle form welled. Related: Welded; welding.
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