Etymology
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flat-boat (n.)
also flat-boat, 1650s, from flat (adj.) + boat (n.).
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life-boat (n.)
"boat built for saving lives at sea," especially in a shipwreck, also lifeboat, 1801 (the thing itself attested by 1785), from life (n.) + boat.
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motor-boat (n.)

also motorboat, "motor-driven boat," 1875, from motor (n.) + boat (n.).

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checker-board (n.)

also checkerboard, "board divided into 64 small squares of alternating color," 1779, from checker (n.1) + board (n.1).

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boast (n.)
mid-13c., "arrogance, presumption, pride, vanity;" c. 1300, "a brag, boastful speech," from Anglo-French bost "ostentation," probably from a Scandinavian source (compare Norwegian baus "proud, bold, daring"), from Proto-Germanic *bausia "to blow up, puff up, swell" (source also of Middle High German bus "swelling," dialectal German baustern "to swell;" Middle Dutch bose, Dutch boos "evil, wicked, angry," Old High German bosi "worthless, slanderous," German böse "evil, bad, angry"), from PIE *bhou-, variant of root *beu-, *bheu-, a root supposed to have formed words associated with swelling (see bull (n.2)).

The notion apparently is of being "puffed up" with pride; compare Old English belgan "to become angry, offend, provoke," belg "anger, arrogance," from the same root as bellows and belly (n.). Meaning "a cause of boasting, occasion of pride" is from 1590s.Related: Boasted; boasting. An Old English word for "boasting" was micelsprecende "big talk."
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boatswain (n.)

mid-15c., from late Old English batswegen, from bat "boat" (see boat (n.)) + Old Norse sveinn "boy" (see swain).

BOATSWAIN. The warrant officer who in the old Navy was responsible for all the gear that set the ship in motion and all the tackle that kept her at rest. [Sir Geoffrey Callender, "Sea Passages," 1943]

He also summons the hands to their duties with a silver whistle. Phonetic spelling bo'sun/bosun is attested from 1840. Fowler [1926] writes, "The nautical pronunciation (bō'sn) has become so general that to avoid it is more affected than to use it."

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foot-board (n.)

"a support for the foot" in a carriage, vehicle, workplace, etc., 1766, from foot (n.) + board (n.1).

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U-boat (n.)
1916 (said to have been in use from 1913), partial translation of German U-Boot, short for Unterseeboot, literally "undersea boat."
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Boanerges 
name given by Christ to his disciples John and James, the two sons of Zebedee (Mark iii.17), Late Latin, from Ecclesiastical Greek Boanerges, from a Galilean dialectal corruption of Hebrew bene reghesh "sons of rage" (interpreted in Greek as "sons of thunder"), from bene (see B'nai B'rith) + reghesh "commotion, tumult, throng." Applied figuratively to zealous or loud preachers.
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boardroom (n.)
also board-room, 1731, from board (n.1) in the sense of "table where council is held" + room (n.).
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