Etymology
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blue-blood (adj.)
1809 in reference to the blood that flows in the veins of the old and aristocratic families of Spain, translating Spanish sangre azul, claimed by certain families of Castile that held themselves uncontaminated by Moorish or Jewish admixture; the term probably is from the notion of the visible veins of people of fair complexion. In reference to English families by 1827. As a noun, "member of an old and aristocratic family," by 1877. See blue (adj.1) + blood (n.).
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moon-calf (n.)

also mooncalf, "abortive, shapeless, fleshy mass," 1560s, attributed to the influence of the moon; from moon (n.) + calf (n.1). In later 16c., "deformed creature, monster;" from 1620s as "congenital idiot."

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moon-dog (n.)

dog who bays at the moon, 1660s, from moon (n.) + dog (n.). Earlier in same sense was mooner (1570s).

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moon-dial (n.)

"dial for showing the hours by the light of the moon," 1680s, from moon (n.) + dial (n.).

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luni- 
word-forming element meaning "of the moon, of the moon and," from Latin luna "moon" (see luna).
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moony (adj.)

1580s, "like the moon;" 1848, "dreamy, listless, bewildered," from moon (n.) + -y (2). Also see moon (v.).

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blueprint (n.)
also blue-print, 1882, from blue (adj.1) + print (n.). The process uses blue on white, or white on blue. Figurative sense of "detailed plan" is attested from 1926. As a verb by 1939.
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cerulean (adj.)

"sky-colored, sky-blue," 1660s, with -an + Latin caeruleus "blue, dark blue, blue-green," perhaps from a dissimilation of caelulum, diminutive of caelum "heaven, sky," which is of uncertain origin (see celestial). The Latin word was applied by Roman authors to the sky, the Mediterranean, and occasionally to leaves or fields. The older adjective in English was ceruleous (1570s). As a noun, from 1756. The artist's cerulean blue is from 1885.

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moonless (adj.)

"without a moon or moonlight," c. 1500, from moon (n.) + -less.

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moonrise (n.)

"rising of the moon, appearance of the moon above the horizon," 1728, from moon (n.) + rise (n.). Verbal noun moon-rising is from late 14c. Browning used moonset (1845) but it seems to be rare.

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