Etymology
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angiography (n.)
1731, "description of the vessels of the body" (blood and nymph), from angio- "blood vessel" + -graphy.
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bloodshot (adj.)
also blood-shot, of the eye, "red and inflamed by swelling of blood vessels," 1550s, short for bloodshotten (c. 1500), from blood (n.) + old past participle of shoot (v.).
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sprout (n.)
"shoot of a plant, sprout; a twig," Old English sprota, from the verb (see sprout (v.)). Cognate with Middle Dutch spruyte, Dutch spruite "a sprout," Old Norse sproti, German Sproß.
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surculation (n.)
"act of pruning," 1660s, noun of action from past participle stem of Latin surculare "chear of shoots or twigs," from surculus "tender young shoot, twig, sprout, sucker."
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sanguinous (adj.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), "bloodshot," from Late Latin sanguinosus "full of blood," from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary). The meaning "pertaining to blood" is from 1813 and is probably a separate borrowing.

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sanguinary (adj.)

1620s, "characterized by slaughter, attended by much bloodshed;" also bloodthirsty, eager to shed blood, delighting in carnage," from French sanguinaire or directly from Latin sanguinarius "of or pertaining to blood," also, rarely, "blood-thirsty," from sanguis (genitive sanguinis) "blood," a word of unknown origin. Latin distinguished sanguis, the generic word, from cruor "blood from a wound" (related to English raw, from PIE root *kreue-). The classical sense of "pertaining to blood" is rare in English.

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anaemia (n.)
"deficiency of blood in a living body," 1824, a medical term from French (1761), from Latinized form of Greek anaimia "lack of blood," from anaimos "bloodless," from an- "without" (see an- (1)) + haima "blood" (see -emia).
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consanguineous (adj.)

"of the same blood, related by birth," c. 1600, from Latin consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

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sanguinivorous (adj.)

"blood-drinking," 1821, from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary) + -vorous "eating, devouring." Also sanguivorous, from the Latin genitive stem.

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twiggy (adj.)
"slender," 1560s, from twig + -y (2). The famous 1960s English model was born Lesley Hornby (1949). The older adjectival form was twiggen "made of twigs" (1540s).
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