Etymology
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shambolic (adj.)

"chaotic, disorderly," 1961, apparently from shamble in the sense "disorder" (see shambles), perhaps on model of symbolic.

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angiography (n.)
1731, "description of the vessels of the body" (blood and nymph), from angio- "blood vessel" + -graphy.
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disturbance (n.)

late 13c., "mental distress, emotional disorder of the mind, grief," from Old French destorbance (12c., Old North French distorbance), from destourber, from Latin disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil" (see turbid).

Meaning "public disturbance, political agitation" is from c. 1300; that of "violent interruption of peace or unity" is late 14c.; it is the sense in disturbance of the (king's) peace," early 15c.

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bloodshot (adj.)
also blood-shot, of the eye, "red and inflamed by swelling of blood vessels," 1550s, short for bloodshotten (c. 1500), from blood (n.) + old past participle of shoot (v.).
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anaemia (n.)
"deficiency of blood in a living body," 1824, a medical term from French (1761), from Latinized form of Greek anaimia "lack of blood," from anaimos "bloodless," from an- "without" (see an- (1)) + haima "blood" (see -emia).
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sanguinous (adj.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), "bloodshot," from Late Latin sanguinosus "full of blood," from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary). The meaning "pertaining to blood" is from 1813 and is probably a separate borrowing.

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sanguinary (adj.)

1620s, "characterized by slaughter, attended by much bloodshed;" also bloodthirsty, eager to shed blood, delighting in carnage," from French sanguinaire or directly from Latin sanguinarius "of or pertaining to blood," also, rarely, "blood-thirsty," from sanguis (genitive sanguinis) "blood," a word of unknown origin. Latin distinguished sanguis, the generic word, from cruor "blood from a wound" (related to English raw, from PIE root *kreue-). The classical sense of "pertaining to blood" is rare in English.

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sanguinivorous (adj.)

"blood-drinking," 1821, from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary) + -vorous "eating, devouring." Also sanguivorous, from the Latin genitive stem.

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periodontitis (n.)

"periodontal disorder," 1842; see periodontal + -itis "inflammation;" though in this case inflammation often is not a feature of the disease.

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consanguineous (adj.)

"of the same blood, related by birth," c. 1600, from Latin consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

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