Etymology
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ass-hole (n.)
also asshole, 20c., perhaps 1880s, American English variant of arsehole (also see ass (n.2)). Meaning "contemptible person" is from mid-1930s. Earlier the word was a Northern English and Scottish dialectal variant of ash-hole "receptacle for ashes beneath a grate." Wright's "English Dialect Dictionary" (1898) lists many examples, such as, "Tell'd her a hunderd times nivver to put t'poaker i' t'ass-hoil" [West Yorkshire].
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bung-hole (n.)
also bunghole, "hole in a cask through which is it filled, closed by a stopper," 1570s, from bung (n.) + hole (n.). Sense extended to "anus" by c. 1600.
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rat-hole (n.)

also rathole, "the hole gnawed in woodwork, etc., by a rat or rats," 1812 first in the figurative sense of "nasty, messy place;" from rat (n.) + hole (n.). As "bottomless hole" (especially one where money goes) by 1921.

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air-hole (n.)

"an opening to admit or discharge air," 1766, from air (n.1) + hole (n.).

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black-hearted (adj.)
"having a cruel or malicious heart," 1792, from black (adj.) + -hearted. Greek had the same image in melanokardios. Related: black-heartedly.
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f-hole (n.)
"one of the two openings in the upper plate of the body of a violin," so called from resemblance to the italic letter f.
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glory hole (n.)
1825, "drawer or box where things are heaped together in a disorderly manner." The first element probably is a variant of Scottish glaur "to make muddy, dirty, defile" (Middle English glorien, mid-15c.), which is perhaps from Old Norse leir "mud." Hence, in nautical use, "a small room between decks," and, in mining, "large opening or pit." Meaning "opening through which the interior of a furnace may be seen and reached" (originally in glassblowing) is from 1849, probably from glory (n.), which had developed a sense of "circle or ring of light" by 1690s. Sexual (originally homosexual) sense from 1940s.
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hell-hole (n.)
also hellhole, late 14c., "the pit of Hell," from hell + hole (n.). Meaning "very unpleasant place" is from 1866.
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button-hole (n.)
1560s, "hole or loop in which a button is caught," from button (n.) + hole (n.). The verb, also buttonhole, meaning "to detain (someone) in conversation against his will" (1862) was earlier button-hold (1834), from button-holder (1806, in this sense). The image is of holding someone by the coat-button so as to detain him.
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