Etymology
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phylogenesis (n.)

"evolution or birth of a species," 1870, coined in German by Haeckel, from phylo- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation." Related: Phylogenetic.

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ethnogenesis (n.)
1957 in modern usage, from ethno- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation." It was the title of an 1861 poem celebrating the birth of the Confederacy by U.S. Southern poet Henry Timrod (1828-1867).
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natality (n.)

late 15c., "birth" (Caxton), a sense now obsolete, from natal + -ity. Sense of "birth-rate, ratio of the number of births in a given period to the total of the population" is from 1884, from French natalité, used in the same sense.

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natal (adj.)

late 14c., "of or pertaining to birthdays;" mid-15c., "of or pertaining to one's birth," from Latin natalis "pertaining to birth or origin," from natus, past participle of nasci "to be born" (Old Latin gnasci), from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget." It is the learned form of Noel, which was the French vernacular word.

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gonad (n.)
1880, from Modern Latin gonas (plural gonades), coined from Greek gone, gonos "child, offspring; seed, that which engenders; birth, childbirth; race, stock, family," related to gignesthai "be born," genos "race, birth, descent," from PIE *gon-o-, suffixed form of root *gene- "give birth, beget." Related: gonads; gonadal.
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naissance (n.)

"birth, origin," late 15c. (Caxton), from French naissance "birth, parentage, place of origin" (12c.), present participle of naître, from Gallo-Roman *nascere, from Latin nasci "be born" (see genus).

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monogony (n.)

"asexual reproduction, reproduction by fission or gemmation," 1869, from Greek monos "single, alone" (see mono-) + -gonia "a begetting," from gonos "birth" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). 

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postnatal (adj.)

"subsequent to birth," 1831, from post- + natal.

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ignoble (adj.)

mid-15c., "of low birth;" 1590s as "not honorable, of low character;" from French ignoble (14c.), from Latin ignobilis "unknown, undistinguished, obscure; of base birth, not noble," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + gnobilis "well-known, famous, renowned, of superior birth," from PIE root *gno- "to know." Related: Ignobly; ignobility.

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multiparous (adj.)

"bringing forth many young at a birth," 1640s, from Modern Latin multiparus "giving or having given birth to many," from multi- "many" + stem of parire "to bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Related: Multiparity.

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