Etymology
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nativity (n.)

early 12c., Nativite, "feast-day celebrating the birth of Christ, Christmas," from Old French nativité "birth, origin, descent; birthday; Christmas" (12c.), from Late Latin nativitatem (nominative nativitas) "birth," from Latin nativus "born, native" (see native (adj.)). Late Old English had nativiteð, from earlier Old French nativited. From late 14c. as "fact of being born; circumstances attending one's birth."

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AWACS (n.)

1966, initialism (acronym) for "Airborne Warning and Control Systems."

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birthplace (n.)

also birth-place, "town, country, etc., where one was born," c. 1600, from birth (n.) + place (n.). Middle English had birthstede (c. 1400).

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-genesis 

word-forming element meaning "birth, origin, creation," from Greek genesis "origin, creation, generation," from gignesthai "to be born," related to genos "race, birth, descent" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).

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phylogenesis (n.)

"evolution or birth of a species," 1870, coined in German by Haeckel, from phylo- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation." Related: Phylogenetic.

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theogony (n.)

1610s, "the account of the birth or genealogy of the gods," from Greek theogonia "generation or genealogy of the gods," from theos "a god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + -gonia "a begetting," from gonos "birth" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget").

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neocolonialism (n.)

also neo-colonialism, "the exertion of influence or control over other nations, especially former dependencies, without direct military or political control," 1955, from neo- "new" + colonialism.

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uncontrolled (adj.)

1510s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of control (v.).

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natality (n.)

late 15c., "birth" (Caxton), a sense now obsolete, from natal + -ity. Sense of "birth-rate, ratio of the number of births in a given period to the total of the population" is from 1884, from French natalité, used in the same sense.

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ethnogenesis (n.)

1957 in modern usage, from ethno- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation." It was the title of an 1861 poem celebrating the birth of the Confederacy by U.S. Southern poet Henry Timrod (1828-1867).

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