Etymology
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ligate (v.)

"bind with a ligature," 1590s, from Latin ligatus, past participle of ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). Related: Ligated; ligating.

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ligand (n.)

in chemistry, 1952, from Latin ligandus, gerundive of ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind").

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colligate (v.)

"to bind or fasten together," 1540s, from Latin colligatus, past participle of colligare "to bind together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). As a concept in logic, from 1837; in linguistics, from 1953. Related: Colligation.

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deligation (n.)

in surgery, "a binding up," 1660s, noun of action from stem of Latin deligare "to bind fast," from de- (see de-) + ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind").

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ally (v.)

late 13c., "to join in marriage" (transitive), from Old French alier "combine, unite," from a differentiated stem of aliier (from Latin alligare "bind to, tie to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ligare "to bind, bind one thing to another, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). Meaning "to form an alliance, join, associate" is late 14c. Related: allied; allying.

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alloy (v.)

c. 1400, "mix (a metal) with a baser metal," from Old French aloiier, aliier "assemble, join," from Latin alligare "bind to, tie to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ligare "to bind, bind one thing to another, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). In figurative use often implying debasement or reduction. Meaning "to mix any two metals" without reference to values is from 1822. Related: Alloyed; alloying.

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disoblige (v.)

c. 1600, "to free from obligation;" 1630s, "to refuse or neglect to oblige," from French désobliger (c. 1300), from des- (see dis-) + obliger, from Latin obligare "to bind, bind up, bandage," figuratively "put under obligation," from ob "to" (see ob-) + ligare "to bind," from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind."

Colloquial sense of "put to inconvenience" is from 1650s (implied in disobligingness). Related: Disobliged; disobliging; disobligingly.

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lictor (n.)

late 14c., from Latin lictor "official attendant upon a magistrate," literally "binder," from past participle stem of *ligere "to bind, collect," collateral form of ligare "to bind, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind").

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spellbind (v.)

also spell-bind, "to bind by or as if by spell," 1795, probably a back-formation from spellbound. Related: Spellbinding; spellbinder.

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oblige (v.)

c. 1300, obligen, "to bind by oath, put under moral or legal obligation, devote," from Old French obligier "engage one's faith, commit (oneself), pledge" (13c.), from Latin obligare "to bind, bind up, bandage," figuratively "put under obligation," from ob "to" (see ob-) + ligare "to bind," from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind." Main modern meaning "to make (someone) indebted by conferring a benefit or kindness" is from 1560s.

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