Etymology
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burka (n.)

also burkha, burqa, etc., "head-to-toe garment worn in public by women in some Muslim countries," 1836, from Hindi, from Arabic burqa'.

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biggen (v.)

1640s, "to make big, increase," also "grow big, become larger," from big (adj.) + -en (1). As a noun, bigger is attested from mid-15c. for "builder."

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hallux (n.)

1831, from Modern Latin hallux, corruption of Late Latin allex "great toe," which is of unknown origin. Related: Hallucal.

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whitlow (n.)

"inflammation on a finger or toe," mid-15c., alteration of whitflaw (c. 1400), from flaw, with first element possibly from Dutch vijt or Low German fit "abscess."

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bigwig (n.)

also big-wig, "great man, person of consequence," 1781, from big + wig, in reference to the imposing wigs formerly worn by men of rank or authority.

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tiptoe (n.)

late 14c., from tip (n.1) + toe (n.). As an adverb from 1590s; as a verb from 1630s. Related: Tiptoes (late 14c.), also tiptoon; tip-toed. Tippy-toes is from 1820.

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stub (v.)

mid-15c., "dig up stumps, dig up by the roots," from stub (n.). The sens of "strike (one's toe) against" something projecting from a surface is first recorded 1848. Meaning "to extinguish a cigarette" is from 1927. Related: Stubbed; stubbing.

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ungual (adj.)

"pertaining to a nail or claw," 1834, from Latin unguis "a claw, nail of the finger or toe;" cognate with Greek onyx, Old English nægel, Old Norse nagl "nail;" see nail (n.).

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