Etymology
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snicker (n.)

"a smothered laugh," 1835, from snicker (v.).

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ventral (adj.)

1739, from French ventral or directly from Late Latin ventralis "of or pertaining to the belly or stomach," from Latin venter (genitive ventris) "belly, paunch; stomach, appetite; womb, unborn child," from PIE *wend-tri- (source also of Latin vesica "bladder," Sanskrit vastih "bladder," Old High German wanast, German wanst "paunch, belly"), perhaps from root *udero- "abdomen, womb, stomach" (see uterus).

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womb (n.)

Old English wamb, womb "belly, bowels, heart, uterus," from Proto-Germanic *wambo (source also of Old Norse vomb, Old Frisian wambe, Middle Dutch wamme, Dutch wam, Old High German wamba, German Wamme "belly, paunch," Gothic wamba "belly, womb," Old English umbor "child"), of unknown origin.

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chuckle (n.)

"a sly, suppressed laugh," 1754, from chuckle (v.).

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gastrolator (n.)

"belly-worshipper; one whose god is his own belly," 1690s, from gastro- + Greek -latros "serving" (see -latry). Perhaps modeled on French gastrolatre. Related: Gastrolatrous.

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hara-kiri (n.)

"suicide by disembowelment," 1856, from Japanese, literally "belly-cutting," the colloquial word for what is formally called seppuku "cut open the stomach;" from hara "belly" + kiri "to cut." Sometimes erroneously written hari-kari.

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chuckle (v.)

1590s, "to laugh loudly," frequentative of Middle English chukken "make a clucking noise" (late 14c.), of imitative origin. Meaning shifted to "laugh in a suppressed or covert way, express inward satisfaction by subdued laughter" by 1803. Related: Chuckled; chuckling.

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larf 

representing a colloquial pronunciation of laugh, by 1836. Also see R.

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laughable (adj.)

"fitted to excite laughter," 1590s, from laugh (v.) + -able. Related: Laughably. In this sense Old English had hleaterlic "laughterly."

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risible (adj.)

1550s, "given to laughter," from French risible (14c.) and directly from Late Latin risibilis "laughable, able to laugh," from Latin risus, past participle of ridere "to laugh," a word which, according to de Vaan, "has no good PIE etymology." Meaning "laughable, capable of exciting laughter, comical" is by 1727. Related: Risibility.

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