Etymology
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sousaphone (n.)

1903, named for U.S. bandleader and composer John Philip Sousa (1854-1932).

The first sousaphone was made by C.G. Conn in 1899 expressly for Sousa's band and its bell opened directly upward. The present bell-front type was first made in 1908. ["International Cyclopedia of Music," 1939]
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ringing (n.)

c. 1300, "act of causing (a bell) to ring;" late 14c., "sound made by a bell," verbal noun from ring (v.1). Meaning "ringing sensation in the ears" is from late 14c.; in Middle English also ringlinge.

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barbell (n.)

exercise device, 1870, from bar (n.1) + ending from dumb-bell.

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passing (n.)

"death," 1869, a euphemistic verbal noun from pass (v.) in such Middle English phrases as passing of death, passing of the soul (c. 1300). A passing-bell (1520s) was a church bell tolled at the time of a person's death.

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tintinnabulation (n.)

"the ringing of bells," 1823, from Latin tintinnabulum "bell," from tintinnare "to ring, jingle" (reduplicated form of tinnire "to ring," from an imitative base) + instrumental suffix -bulum. Earlier forms in English were adjectives tintinnabulary (1787), tintinnabulatory (1827), and noun tintinnabulum "small bell" (late 14c.).

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timbre (n.)

"characteristic quality of a musical sound," 1849, from French timbre "quality of a sound," earlier "sound of a bell," from Old French, "bell without a clapper," originally "small drum," probably via Medieval Greek *timbanon, from Greek tympanon "kettledrum" (see tympanum). Timbre was used in Old French (13c.) and Middle English (14c.) to render Latin tympanum in Psalms cl.

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handbell (n.)

one rung by hand rather than by rope, etc., Old English handbelle; see hand (n.) + bell (n.).

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campanile (n.)

"bell-tower," especially a detached high building erected for containing bells, 1630s, from Italian, from campana "bell," from Late Latin campana, originally "metal vessel made in Campania," region of southern Italy, including the Neapolitan plain, from Latin Campania, literally "level country" (see campaign (n.)).

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Big Ben (n.)

clock-bell in the Parliament tower in London, by 1861, generally said to have been named for Sir Benjamin Hall (1802-1867), first Chief Commissioner of Works, under whose supervision the bell was cast. The name later was extended to the clock itself and its tower.

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jinglet (n.)

"loose metal ball serving as the clapper of a sleigh-bell," 1875, diminutive of jingle (n.).

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