Etymology
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abolitionism (n.)
"belief in the principle of abolishing (something)," 1790, in a purely anti-slavery sense (distinguished from opposition to the slave trade); from abolition + -ism.
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miscredit (v.)

"give no credit or belief to, disbelieve," 1550s, from mis- (1) + credit (v.). Related: Miscredited; miscrediting.

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cogency (n.)

"power of producing belief, quality of being highly probable or convincing," 1680s, from cogent + abstract noun suffix -cy.

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presumable (adj.)

"capable of being taken for granted, entitled to belief without examination or direct evidence," 1690s, from presume + -able.

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Aryanism (n.)
1858, "characteristic Aryan principles," from Aryan + -ism. As a belief in cultural or racial superiority of Aryans, from 1905.
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creditable (adj.)

1520s, "worthy of belief," from credit (v.) + -able. Meaning "reputable, bringing credit or honor" is from 1650s. Related: Creditably; creditability; creditableness.

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nothingarian (n.)

"one who has no particular belief," especially in religious matters, 1789, from nothing + ending from unitarian, etc. Related: Nothingarianism.

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felicitation (n.)

"complimentary expression of belief in another's happiness or good fortune," 1709, noun of action from felicitate. Related: Felicitations.

Congratulation, like its verb congratulate, implies an actual feeling of pleasure in another's happiness or good fortune; while felicitation (with felicitate) rather refers to the expression on our part of a belief that the other is fortunate, felicitations being complimentary expressions intended to make the fortunate person well pleased with himself. [Century Dictionary]
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secularism (n.)
"doctrine that morality should be based on the well-being of man in the present life, without regard to religious belief or a hereafter," 1846, from secular + -ism.
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impossibilism (n.)
"belief in social reforms (or other ideas) that could not practically be attained or accomplished," 1885, from impossible + -ism. Related: Impossibilist.
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