Etymology
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venality (n.)
1610s, from French vénalité or directly from Late Latin venalitatem (nominative venalitas) "capability of being bought," from Latin venalis "capable of being bought" (see venal).
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modality (n.)

"fact of being a mode," 1610s, from French modalité or directly from Medieval Latin modalitatem (nominative modalitas) "a being modal," from modalis (see modal). Related: Modalities.

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plausibility (n.)

1590s, "quality of being worthy of praise or acceptance," from plausible + -ity. Especially "a specious or superficial appearance of being right or worthy of acceptance" (by 1640s).

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lateness (n.)
Old English lætness "slowness," from late (adj.) + -ness. From late 14c. as "a being advanced in time;" from 1881 as "a being behind the proper time."
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removable (adj.)

early 15c., remevable, "capable of being removed" from an office or station; 1530s as "capable of being moved from one place to another;" from remove (v.) + -able. Related: Removability.

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zoo- 
word-forming element meaning "animal, living being," from Greek zoion "an animal," literally "a living being," from PIE root *gwei- "to live" (source also of Greek bios "life").
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in fieri 
legal Latin, "in the process of being done," from fieri "to come into being, become," used as passive of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
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retractable (adj.)

1610s, "capable of being disowned, that may be retracted;" 1769 as "capable of being drawn in;" see retract + -able. Also sometimes spelled retractible. Related: Retractability.

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craziness (n.)

c. 1600, "infirmity, state of being broken down," from crazy + -ness. Oldest sense is now obsolete. The meaning "state of being flawed or damaged" is from 1660s; that of "mental unsoundness" is from 1755.

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mortal (n.)

1520s, "mortal thing or substance;" 1560s, "a human being" (as subject to death); from mortal (adj.). Latin mortalis also was used as a noun, "a man, mortal, human being."

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