Etymology
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patrilocal (adj.)

1906, in reference to the customs of certain social groups where a married couple settles in the husband's house or community, from patri- + local (adj.).

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publicness (n.)

"character of common possession or interest; openness or exposure to notice or knowledge of the community or of people at large," c. 1600, from public (adj.) + -ness.

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homogeny (n.)
1620s, "uniformity of nature;" by 1856 in biological sense "descent from a common ancestor," from Greek homogeneia "community of origin," from homogene "of the same race or kind" (see homogeneous).
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aristocrat (n.)
"one having high rank in a community," also "advocate of aristocratic government," 1789, from French aristocrate, a word of the Revolution, a back-formation from aristocratie (see aristocracy).
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society (n.)
1530s, "companionship, friendly association with others," from Old French societe "company" (12c., Modern French société), from Latin societatem (nominative societas) "fellowship, association, alliance, union, community," from socius "companion, ally," from PIE *sokw-yo-, suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow."

Meaning "group, club" is from 1540s, originally of associations of persons for some specific purpose. Meaning "people bound by neighborhood and intercourse aware of living together in an ordered community" is from 1630s. Sense of "the more cultivated part of any community" first recorded 1823, hence "fashionable people and their doings." The Society Islands were named 1769 by Cook on his third Pacific voyage in honor of the Royal Society, which financed his travels across the world to observe the transit of Venus.
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menfolk (n.)

also men-folk, colloquial, "the men of a household or community collectively; the male sex, men generally," by 1802, from men + folk (n.). Related: men-folks.

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collegiate (adj.)

"pertaining to or of the nature of a college," mid-15c., from Latin collegiatus "member of a college or corporation," in Medieval Latin, "of or pertaining to a college," from collegium "community, society, guild" (see college).

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sangha 

community of monks, 1858, from Hindi sangha, Sanskrit samgha, from sam "together" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with") + han "to come in contact."

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poor-rate (n.)

"assessment or tax imposed by law for the relief or support of the poor in a particular community," c. 1600, from poor (n.) + rate (n.).

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mir 

1877, "a Russian commune or village," also (with capital M-) the name of a late 20c. space station, Russian, literally "peace, world," also "village, community," from Old Church Slavonic miru "peace," from Proto-Slavic *miru "commune, joy, peace" ("possibly borrowed from Iranian" [Watkins]), from PIE root *mei- (4) "to bind, tie" (see mitre). Old Church Slavonic miru was "used in Christian terminology as a collective 'community of peace' " [Buck], translating Greek kosmos. Hence, "the known world, mankind."

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