Etymology
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fertile (adj.)

mid-15c., fertil, "bearing or producing abundantly," from Old French fertil (15c.) and directly from Latin fertilis "bearing in abundance, fruitful, productive," from ferre "to bear" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children"). Fertile Crescent (1914) was coined by U.S. archaeologist James H. Breasted (1865-1935) of University of Chicago in "Outlines of European History," Part I.

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barrenness (n.)
late 14c., "incapacity for child-bearing" (of women); "unproductivity, unfruitfulness" (of land); earlier in a figurative sense ("spiritual emptiness," mid-14c.), from barren + -ness.
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fund (v.)
1776, "convert (a debt) into capital or stock represented by interest-bearing bonds," from fund (n.). Meaning "supply (someone or something) with money, to finance" is from 1900.
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hauteur (n.)
"a haughty bearing, arrogance of manner," 1620s, from French hauteur "haughtiness, arrogance," literally "height," from Old French hauture "height, loftiness; grandeur, majesty" (12c.), from haut (see haught).
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dignified (adj.)

1660s, "exalted, honored, ranking as a dignitary," past-participle adjective from dignify. By 1812 in the sense of "having a dignified manner, marked with dignity; of noble bearing; grave or stately."

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chinkapin (n.)

also chincapin, chinquapin, "small tree or shrub of eastern U.S., bearing a nut like the chestnut," 1610s, from < chechinquamins >, a word in a central Atlantic coast Algonquian language, 

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long-suffering (adj.)
also longsuffering, "bearing wrongs without retaliating," 1530s, from long (adj.) + suffering (n.). Old English had langmodig in this sense. From 1520s as a noun, "patience under offense."
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effete (adj.)
1620s, "functionless as a result of age or exhaustion," from Latin effetus (usually in fem. effeta) "exhausted, unproductive, worn out (with bearing offspring), past bearing," literally "that has given birth," from a lost verb, *efferi, from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fetus "childbearing, offspring" (see fetus). Figurative use is earliest in English; literal use is rare. Sense of "intellectually or morally exhausted" (1790) led to that of "decadent, effeminate" (by 1850s).
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portly (adj.)

late 15c., portli, "stately, dignified, of noble appearance and carriage," from port (n.3) "bearing, carriage" + -ly (1). Meaning "stout, somewhat large and unwieldy in person" is attested by 1590s.

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poriferous (adj.)

"bearing or having pores," 1834, from Latin porus "pore, opening" (see pore (n.)) + -ferous "producing, containing," from Latin ferre "to bear, carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry").

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