Etymology
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Jacuzzi (n.)

type of whirlpool bath, 1961, U.S. proprietary name, from Jacuzzi Brothers, then headquartered in California, who earlier made jet pumps for motorboats. The family immigrated from Friuli in northern Italy.

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sauna (n.)

"Finnish steam bath," also the house or room where it is taken, 1881, from Finnish sauna. Originally in a Finnish context; by 1959 in reference to installation in homes and gyms outside Finland.

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developer (n.)

1833, "one who or that which develops," agent noun from develop. Photography use in reference to the chemical bath used to bring out the latent image is attested from 1869; meaning "speculative builder" is by 1938.

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hothouse (n.)

mid-15c., "bath house," from hot + house (n.). In 17c. a euphemism for "brothel;" the meaning "glass-roofed structure for raising tender plants or protecting exotics" is from 1749. Figurative use of this sense by 1802.

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apodyterium (n.)

"undressing room" (in a Greek or Roman bath house or palaestra), 1690s, from Latin apodyterium, from Greek apodyterion "undressing room," from apodyein "to put off, undress," from apo "off" (see apo-) + dyein "to put on, enter, go in" (see ecdysiast).

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natatorium (n.)

1890, a New Englandish word for "swimming pool, place for swimming," from Late Latin natatorium, from Latin natator "swimmer" (from nare "to swim") + -ium, neuter suffix. Latin nare is from PIE root *sna- "to swim." Middle English had natatorie "a pool, bath," early 14c., from Latin.

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fridge (n.)

shortened and altered form of refrigerator, 1926, an unusual way of word-formation in English; perhaps influenced by Frigidaire (1919), name of a popular early brand of self-contained automatically operated iceless refrigerator (Frigidaire Corporation, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.), a name suggesting Latin frigidarium "a cooling room in a bath." Frigerator as a colloquial shortening is attested by 1886.

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caldera (n.)

"cavity on the summit of a volcano," 1865, from Spanish caldera, literally "cauldron, kettle," from Latin caldarium "hot-bath" (plural caldaria), from caldarius "pertaining to warming," from calidus "warm, hot" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm"). A doublet of cauldron.

The term was originally used in describing volcanic regions occurring where Spanish is the current language, and was introduced by Von Buch in his description of the Canaries. [Century Dictionary]
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Sally 

fem. proper name, an alteration of Sarah (compare Hal from Harry, Moll from Mary, etc.). Sally Lunn cakes (by 1780), sweet and spongy, supposedly were named for the young woman in Bath who first made them and sold them in the streets. Sally Ann as a nickname for Salvation Army is recorded from 1927.

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bain-marie (n.)

"shallow, flat vessel containing hot water in which another vessel is placed to heat its contents gently," by 1733 (in a cookery book, earlier, 1724 as the name of a meat dish cooked in one), from French bain-marie, from Medieval Latin balneum Mariae, literally "bath of Mary."

According to French sources, perhaps so called for the gentleness of its heating; others credit the name to the supposed inventor, Mary the Jewess, mentioned in early gnostic writings and looked on since 4c. C.E. as a founder of alchemy. Middle English had balne of mary (late 15c.). French bain was used by itself in English in various sense 15c.-17c.; it is from baigner "to bathe" (12c.), from Latin balneare, from balneum "bath" (see balneal).

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