Etymology
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righty (n.)

"right-handed person," 1949, especially in baseball, from right (adj.2) + -y (3).

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twirler (n.)
1808, agent noun from twirl (v.). As baseball slang for "pitcher," by 1891.
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heater (n.)
c. 1500, of persons; 1660s of devices; agent noun from heat (v.). Baseball slang meaning "fastball" is attested by 1985.
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all-American (n.)
1888, plural, as the name of a barnstorming baseball team composed of players from various teams across the United States. From all + American.
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interleague (adj.)
also inter-league, by 1917 in a U.S. baseball sense, from inter- "between" + league (n.). Earlier (1580s) as a verb, "to combine in a league."
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tag (v.2)
"a touch in the game of tag," 1878; in baseball, 1904, from tag (n.2); the adjective in the pro-wrestling sense is recorded from 1955. Related: Tagged; tagging.
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lefty (n.)
"left-handed person," 1886, American English, baseball slang, from left (adj.) + -y (3). Political sense by 1935.
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e.r.a. (n.)
1949 in baseball as initialism (acronym) for earned run average. From 1971 in U.S. politics for Equal Rights Amendment.
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softball (n.)
baseball of larger than usual size, used in a scaled-down version of the game, 1914, from soft + ball (n.1). The game itself so called from 1916, also known as playground baseball. The word earlier was a term in sugar candy making (1894). Softball question, one that is easy to answer, is attested from 1976.
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batboy (n.)
also bat-boy, 1910, "youth who has charge of the bats and other equipment of a baseball team," from bat (n.1) + boy.
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