Etymology
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second-guess (v.)

by 1938, originally a baseball verb; see second (adj.) + guess (n.).

The expression second guess originated in big league baseball. In baseball, a man making a play has time only for one thought on that particular play. He must make up his mind in a flash how he is going to make the play. ... The expression came into the common speech because it so patly describes us fellows who sit back and analyze a wrong play after it has been made. [Damon Runyon, "The Brighter Side," Nov. 18, 1938]

The record of the phrase, at least in newspapers, seems to support the baseball origin. Second-guesser (1913) was baseball slang for "fan who loudly questions decisions by players, managers, etc.," and from about 1899 guesser or baseball guesser had been used in sports-writing for "fan who speculates and opines on the upcoming games or season."

Quisser is the new Texas league umpire. Guesser would be a better name for the majority of those who are now employed by president Allen. [El Paso Herald, June 14, 1911]
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compound (n.1)

"enclosed residence," 1670s, "the enclosure for a factory or settlement of Europeans in the East," via Dutch (kampoeng) or Portuguese, from Malay (Austronesian) kampong "village, group of buildings." Spelling influenced by compound (v.). Later used of South African diamond miners' camps (1893), then of large fenced-in residences generally (1946).

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southpaw (n.)

"lefthander," 1885, originally baseball slang, of pitchers, often said to have been coined by Finley Peter Dunne ("Mr. Dooley"), Chicago sports journalist and humorist, in the days when, it is said, baseball diamonds regularly were laid out with home plate to the west. But south paw "a person's left hand" is attested from 1848 in the slang of pugilism.

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fielding (n.)

"play in the field," 1823 in cricket (by 1867 in baseball), verbal noun from field (v.).

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facet (n.)

1620s, "one side of a multi-sided body," from French facette (12c., Old French facete), diminutive of face "face, appearance" (see face (n.)). The diamond-cutting sense is the original one. Transferred and figurative use by 1820. Related: Faceted; facets.

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shortstop (n.)

also short-stop, 1837 in cricket ("player stationed behind the wicket-keeper at about 45 degrees to the wicket"); 1857 in baseball ("player stationed between second and third base"); from short (adj.) + stop (n.). In cricket there is a longstop, but in baseball there is none.

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center-field (n.)

also centerfield, 1857 in baseball, "the middle third of the outfield," from center (n.) + field (n.). Related: Center-fielder.

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heater (n.)

c. 1500, of persons; 1660s of devices; agent noun from heat (v.). Baseball slang meaning "fastball" is attested by 1985.

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all-American (n.)

1888, plural, as the name of a barnstorming baseball team composed of players from various teams across the United States. From all + American.

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righty (n.)

"right-handed person," 1949, especially in baseball, from right (adj.2) + -y (3).

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