Etymology
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Radnor 
place in eastern Wales, the name is Old English, literally "at the red bank," from Old English read (dative singular readan; from PIE root *reudh- "red, ruddy") + ofer "bank, slope."
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riverside (n.)

"the bank of a river," c. 1400, from river + side (n.).

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bunco (n.)
also bunko, type of confidence swindle, 1872, perhaps from Italian banco "bank."
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berm (n.)
"narrow ledge," 1729, from French berme (17c.), from Old Dutch baerm "edge of a dike," which is probably related to brim (q.v.). In U.S., especially "grass strip beside a road," originally the name for the bank of a canal opposite the tow path (1833; berm-bank is from 1832).
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Bremen 
city in Germany, from Old Saxon bremo "edge" (related to English brim (n.)), in reference to its site on a river bank.
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check-book (n.)

also checkbook, cheque-book, "book containing blank checks on a bank," 1872, from check (n.1) in the financial sense + book (n.).

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Clifford 

surname and later a masc. proper name, attested from 12c. as a surname, originally a place-name, "ford at the steep bank;" see cliff + ford (n.).

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riparian (adj.)

"of or pertaining to river banks, situated on or near a river bank," 1849, with -an + Latin riparius "of a river bank," from riparia "shore," later used in reference to the stream flowing between the banks, from ripa "(steep) bank of a river, shore."

This is probably etymologically "break" (and indicating the drop off from ground level to the stream bed), or else "that which is cut out by the river," from PIE root *rei- "to scratch, tear, cut" (source also of Greek ereipia "ruins," eripne "slope, precipice;" Old Norse rifa "break, to tear apart;" Danish rift "breach," Middle High German rif "riverbank, seashore;" English riven, rift).

Riparious, of animals, "living on or in river banks," is from 1650s.

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negotiable (adj.)

1749, "capable of being negotiated" (of bills, bank notes, etc.), from negotiate + -able, or from French négociable (17c.). Of roads, passages, etc., by 1880. Related: Negotiably; negotiability.

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sandbar (n.)

also sand-bar, "bank of sand formed by action of water in the bottom of a river or at its mouth," 1755, from sand (n.) + bar (n.1).

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