Etymology
Advertisement
back-to-nature (adj.)
1915, from the adverbial phrase.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
backstreet (n.)
mid-15c., from back (adj.), here perhaps with a sense "inferior, mean, obscure" + street.
Related entries & more 
backscratcher (n.)
also back-scratcher, 1834; see back (n.) + scratch (v.).
Related entries & more 
backer (n.)
"supporter, one who aids and abets," 1580s, agent noun from back (v.).
Related entries & more 
backslash (n.)
punctuation symbol introduced for computer purposes, by 1977, from back (adj.) + slash (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
backflip (n.)

"a backwards somersault in the air," 1906; see back (adj.) + flip (n.).

Related entries & more 
backdrop (n.)

1883 in theatrical argot, "painted cloth hung at the back of a stage as part of the scenery," from back (adj.) + drop (n.).

Related entries & more 
backbone (n.)
"spine, vertebral column," early 14c., from back (n.) + bone (n.). Figurative sense of "firmness of purpose, strength of character" is by 1843.
Related entries & more 
backless (adj.)
"without a back," 1919, in reference to women's gowns and dresses, earlier of benches, from back (n.) + -less.
Related entries & more 
backpedal (v.)
also back-pedal, 1883, in bicycling; see back (adv.) + pedal (v.). Related: Backpedalling (1887).
Related entries & more 

Page 3