Etymology
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Voltaire 

name taken from 1718 by French author François Marie Arouet after his imprisonment in the Bastille on suspicion of having written some satirical verses; originally de Voltaire. The signification is uncertain.

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Horst Wessel 
name of a Nazi activist and SA bandleader (1907-1930), author in 1929 of the lyrics to what became the German Nazi party anthem, known after as the Horst-Wessel-Lied ("Horst Wessel Song").
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Rabelaisian (adj.)

1775, "of or pertaining to the writings or style of 16c. French author François Rabelais," whose writings "are distinguished by exuberance of imagination and language combined with extravagance and coarseness of humor and satire." [OED]

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SMERSH (n.)
Soviet Army counter-espionage organization begun during World War II, 1953, from Russian abbreviation of smert' shpionam "death to spies." Introduced in English by "James Bond" author Ian Fleming.
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Junius 
masc. proper name, from Latin Junius, name of a Roman gens. In U.S. history, the pseudonym of the author of a famous series of letters in the "Public Advertiser" from 1768-1772 critical of crown policy. Related: Junian.
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Jehovist (n.)
1844 as the name given by scholars to the presumed author or authors of the parts of the Hexateuch in which the divine name is written Yhwh (see Jehovah) + -ist. Opposed to the Elohist. Sometimes Jahvist is used. Related: Jehovistic.
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robotics (n.)

"the science of robots, their construction and use," 1941, from robot + -ics. Coined in a science fiction context by Russian-born U.S. author Isaac Asimov (1920-1992), who proposed the "Three Laws of Robotics" in 1968.

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Peter Principle (n.)

1968, "in a hierarchy, every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence," named for (and by) Laurence Johnston Peter (1919-1990) Canadian-born U.S. educationalist and author, who described it in his book of the same name (1969).

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Mitty 

also Walter Mitty, in reference to an adventurous daydreamer, by 1950, from title character in "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," short story by U.S. author James Thurber (1894-1961) first published in the New Yorker March 18, 1939.

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neophobia (n.)

"fear of novelty, abhorrence of what is new or unaccustomed," 1877; see neo- "new" + -phobia "fear." German neophobie is attested as a dictionary word from 1870; Docteur Neophobus was an alias of French author Charles Nodier (1780-1844). Related: Neophobe; neophobic.

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