Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for auction. Showing results for action.
memorization (n.)

1823 "act or fact of memorializing;" 1857 as "action of committing to memory;" noun of action from memorize (v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
evangelization (n.)

1650s, "action of preaching the gospel," noun of action from evangelize. From 1827 as "act of bringing under the influence of the gospel."

Related entries & more 
rescission (n.)

1610s, "action of cutting off" (a sense now obsolete); 1650s, "action of annulling," from Late Latin rescissionem (nominative rescisio) "annulment, a making void," noun of action from past-participle stem of rescindere "to cut off; abolish" (see rescind).

Related entries & more 
avoidance (n.)

late 14c., "action of emptying," from avoid + -ance. The sense of "action of dodging or shunning" is recorded from early 15c.; it also meant "action of making legally invalid" (1620s), and, of an office, etc., "becoming vacant" (mid-15c.).

Related entries & more 
aspiration (n.2)

late 14c., "action of aspirating, a spirant letter or sound," noun of action from aspirate (v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
impletion (n.)

"action of filling," 1580s, from Late Latin impletionem, noun of action from stem of implere "to fill, fill up" (see implement (n.)).

Related entries & more 
expression (n.)

early 15c., expressioun, "action of pressing out;" later "action of manifesting a feeling;" "a putting into words" (mid-15c.); from Late Latin expressionem (nominative expressio) "expression, vividness," in classical Latin "a pressing out, a projection," noun of action from past-participle stem of exprimere "represent, describe," literally "press out" (see express (v.)). Meaning "an action or creation that expresses feelings" is from 1620s. Of the face, from 1774. Occasionally the word also was used literally, for "the action of squeezing out." Related: Expressional.

Related entries & more 
disarmament (n.)

"action of disarming," by 1795; see noun of action from disarm. Especially in reference to reduction of military and naval forces from a war to a peace footing.

Related entries & more 
scrutinization (n.)

"minute search, scrutiny, close examination," 1772, noun of action from scrutinize. Earlier was scrutation (1590s), from Latin noun of action scrutationem (nominative scrutatio).

Related entries & more 
routinization (n.)

"a being or becoming routine; action of imposing a routine upon," 1916, noun of action from routinize "subject to a routine, make into a routine" (1893), from routine + -ize.

Related entries & more 

Page 3