Etymology
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No results were found for atone. Showing results for alone.
single-handed (adj.)
1709, "done alone," from single (adj.) + -handed. Meaning "using one hand only" is from 1844. Related: Single-handedly.
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singularly (adv.)
late 14c., "exclusively, alone, solely; uniquely; individually; in an unusual way, especially," from singular + -ly (2).
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monolingual (adj.)

"speaking or using only one language," by 1939, from mono- "single, alone" + ending from bilingual, etc.

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desolate (adj.)

mid-14c., of persons, "disconsolate, miserable, overwhelmed with grief, deprived of comfort;" late 14c., of persons, "without companions, solitary, lonely;" also, of places, "uninhabited, abandoned," from Latin desolatus, past participle of desolare "leave alone, desert," from de- "completely" (see de-) + solare "make lonely," from solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)). Related: Desolately; desolateness.

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sullen (adj.)
1570s, alteration of Middle English soleyn "unique, singular," from Anglo-French *solein, formed on the pattern of Old French solain "lonely," from soul "single," from Latin solus "by oneself, alone" (see sole (adj.)). The sense shift in Middle English from "solitary" to "morose" (i.e. "remaining alone through ill-humor") occurred late 14c. Related: Sullenly; sullenness.
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driveway (n.)

1870, "a way for driving," from drive (v.) + way (n.). Drive alone in this sense is attested from 1816. Specifically as "private road from a public road to a private house" by 1884. 

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cuppa (n.)
colloquial shortening of cup of (coffee, etc.), recorded from 1925; as a stand-alone (almost always with implied tea) it dates from 1934.
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monologue (n.)

1660s, "long speech by one person, scene in a drama in which a person speaks by himself," from French monologue, from Late Greek monologos "speaking alone or to oneself," from Greek monos "single, alone" (from PIE root *men- (4) "small, isolated") + logos "speech, word," from legein "to speak," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')." Related: Monologist.

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monoglot (adj.)

"speaking or using only one language," 1830, from Late Greek monoglōttos, from monos "single, alone" (see mono-) + glōtta "tongue, language" (see gloss (n.2)).

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monastery (n.)

"place of residence occupied in common by persons seeking religious seclusion from the world," c. 1400, monasterie, from Old French monastere "monastery" (14c.) and directly from Late Latin monasterium, from Ecclesiastical Greek monastērion "a monastery," from monazein "to live alone," from monos "alone" (from PIE root *men- (4) "small, isolated"). With suffix -terion "place for (doing something)." Originally applied to houses of any religious order, male or female, but commonly especially one used by monks. Related: Monasterial (mid-15c.).

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