Etymology
Advertisement
colostrum (n.)

"the first milk secreted in the breasts after childbirth," 1570s, from Latin colostrum "first milk from an animal," earlier colustra, a word of unknown etymology.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Irene 

fem. proper name, from French Irène, from Latin Irene, from Greek Eirēnē, literally "peace, time of peace," a word of unknown etymology.

Related entries & more 
wormwood (n.)
c. 1400, folk etymology of Old English wermod "wormwood, absinthe," related to vermouth, but the ultimate etymology is unknown. Compare Old Saxon wermoda, Dutch wermoet, Old High German werimuota, German Wermut. Weekley suggests wer "man" + mod "courage," from its early use as an aphrodisiac. Figurative use, however, is usually in reference to its proverbial bitter aftertaste. Perhaps because of the folk etymology, it formerly was used to protect clothes and bedding from moths and fleas. "A medecyne for an hawke that hath mites. Take the Iuce of wormewode and put it ther thay be and thei shall dye." ["Book of St. Albans," 1486]
Related entries & more 
thrombus (n.)

1690s, Modern Latin, from Greek thrombos "lump, piece, clot of blood, curd of milk," a word of uncertain etymology.

Related entries & more 
Kevlar 
registered trademark (DuPont) for a synthetic fiber developed there c. 1965; probably an invented word of no etymology.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
biomorph (n.)

"a decorative form representing a living object," 1895 (A.C. Haddon), from bio- "life" + -morph "form," a word of uncertain etymology. Related: Biomorphic.

Related entries & more 
etymologicon (n.)
"a work in which etymologies are traced," 1640s, from Latin etymologicon, from Greek etymologikon, neuter of etymologikos (see etymology). Plural is etymologica.
Related entries & more 
etymologize (v.)
1530s (transitive); see etymology + -ize. Compare French étymologiser, from Medieval Latin etymologisare. Intransitive sense from 1650s. Related: Etymologized; etymologizing.
Related entries & more 
antrum (n.)
"a cave or cavity of the body," 1727, medical Latin, from Greek antron "a cave," a word of uncertain etymology, perhaps from a pre-Greek substrate language. Related: Antral.
Related entries & more 
emu (n.)
large Australian three-toed bird, 1610s, probably from Portuguese ema "crane, ostrich" (which is of unknown origin), perhaps based on a folk-etymology of a native name.
Related entries & more 

Page 3