Etymology
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underwear (n.)
"undergarments," 1872, from under + wear (n.). So called because they are worn under one's clothing.
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pantsuit (n.)

"suit of clothing for women, consisting of pants and a matching or coordinating coat or jacket," 1966, contraction of pants suit (1964), from pants + suit (n.).

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articular (adj.)
"involving joints," early 15c., from Latin articularis "pertaining to the joints," from articulus "a joint" (see article).
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sidebar (n.)
"secondary article accompanying a larger one in a newspaper," 1948, from side (adj.) + bar (n.1).
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tuck (n.)
late 14c., "flattened fold in clothing, pleat," from tuck (v.). As a folded-up diving position, from 1951.
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fastener (n.)
1755, "one who fastens," agent noun from fasten (v.). From 1792 of mechanical devices (for clothing, etc.).
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cleavage (n.)

1805, in geology and mineralogy, "tendency (of rocks or gems) to break cleanly along natural fissures," from cleave (v.1) + -age. General meaning "action or state of cleaving or being cleft" is from 1867.

The sense of "cleft between a woman's breasts in low-cut clothing" is first recorded 1946, defined in a "Time" magazine article [Aug. 5] as the "Johnston Office trade term for the shadowed depression dividing an actress' bosom into two distinct sections;" traditionally first used in this sense by U.S. publicist Joseph I. Breen (1888-1965), head of the Production Code Administration (replaced 1945 by Eric Johnston), enforcers of Hollywood self-censorship, in reference to Jane Russell's costumes and poses in "The Outlaw."

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military (n.)

"soldiers generally," 1757, from military (adj.); commonly only with the definite article. Earlier, "a military man" (1736).

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frog (n.2)

type of fastening for clothing, 1719, originally a belt loop for carrying a weapon, of unknown origin; perhaps from Portuguese froco, from Latin floccus "tuft of wool," a word of unknown etymology.

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skyclad (adj.)
also sky-clad, "naked," 1909, from sky (n.) + clad. Perhaps translating Sanskrit digam-bara "having the four quarters for clothing."
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