Etymology
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royal (n.)

"royal person," c. 1400, from royal (adj.). Specifically "member of the royal family" from 1774, colloquial.

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Paige 

fem. proper name, also a family name, variant of page (n.2) "young servant."

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familiar (adj.)

mid-14c., "intimate, very friendly, on a family footing," from Old French famelier "related; friendly," from Latin familiaris "domestic, private, belonging to a family, of a household;" also "familiar, intimate, friendly," a dissimilation of *familialis, from familia (see family).

From late 14c. as "of or pertaining to one's family." Of things, "known from long association," from late 15c. Meaning "ordinary, usual" is from 1590s.

The noun meaning "demon, evil spirit that answers one's call" is from 1580s (familiar spirit is attested from 1560s); earlier as a noun it meant "a familiar friend" (late 14c.). The Latin plural, used as a noun, meant "the slaves," also "a friend, intimate acquaintance, companion."

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gentility (n.)

mid-14c., "nobility of birth, gentle birth," from Old French gentilité (14c.), from Latin gentilitatem (nominative gentilitas) "relationship in the same family or clan," from gentilis "of the same family or clan" (see gentle; also compare gentry). From 1640s as "social superiority." Meaning "state of being gentile" is rare.

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ani (n.)

black bird of the cuckoo family native to the American tropics, 1829, from Spanish or Portuguese ani, from Tupi.

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Amharic (n.)

principal language of Ethiopia, 1813, from Amhara, name of a central province in Ethiopia. It is in the Semitic family.

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Kickapoo 

Native American people of the Algonquian family, 1722, from native /kiikaapoa/ which is sometimes interpreted as "wanderers" [Bright].

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husbandman (n.)

c. 1300, "head of a family;" early 14c. as "farmer, tiller of the soil," from husband (n.) + man (n.).

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san 

Japanese honorific title suffixed to personal or family names, 1878, short form of more formal sama.

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household (n.)

late 14c., "members of a family collectively (including servants)," also "furniture and articles belonging to a house;" see house (n.) + hold (n.1). As an adjective, "of or pertaining to house and family, domestic," from late 14c. Compare householder. Household word, one that is in very familiar use, is from 1590s; variant household name is from 1862.

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