Etymology
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*ar- 

also arə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to fit together."

It forms all or part of: adorn; alarm; aristarchy; aristo-; aristocracy; arm (n.1) "upper limb of the body;" arm (n.2) "weapon;" armada; armadillo; armament; armature; armilla; armistice; armoire; armor; armory; army; art (n.) "skill as a result of learning or practice;" arthralgia; arthritis; arthro-; arthropod; arthroscopy; article; articulate; artifact; artifice; artisan; artist; coordination; disarm; gendarme; harmony; inert; inertia; inordinate; ordain; order; ordinal; ordinance; ordinary; ordinate; ordnance; ornament; ornate; primordial; subordinate; suborn.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit irmah "arm," rtih "manner, mode;" Armenian arnam "make," armukn "elbow;" Greek arti "just," artios "complete, suitable," artizein "to prepare," arthron "a joint;" Latin ars (stem art-) "art, skill, craft," armus "shoulder," artus "joint," arma "weapons;" Old Prussian irmo "arm;" German art "manner, mode."

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artificially (adv.)

"by art or human skill and contrivance," early 15c.; see artificial + -ly (2).

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artificiality (n.)

"appearance of art; insincerity," 1763; see artificial + -ity. Earlier was artificialness (1590s); Middle English had artificy (early 15c.).

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beaux arts (n.)

"the fine arts," 1821, from French; also in reference to Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, and the widely imitated conventional type of art and architecture advocated there.

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artificer (n.)

late 14c., "one who makes by art or skill," agent noun from artifice. Especially an inventor of devious artifices (c. 1600). The military sense of "soldier-mechanic" dates from 1758.

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artillery (n.)

late 14c., "warlike munitions," especially ballistic engines, from Anglo-French artillerie, Old French artillerie (14c.), from artillier "to provide with engines of war" (13c.), which probably is from Medieval Latin articulum "art, skill," a diminutive of Latin ars (genitive artis) "art." But some would connect it to Latin articulum "joint," others to Latin apere "to attach, join," and still others to Old French atillier "to equip," altered by influence of arte.

Originally any engine for discharging missiles (catapults, slings, bows, etc.); the modern restriction to "ordnance, large guns" is from 16c. Technically, "all firearms discharged from carriages," as opposed to small arms, discharged by hand. As a branch of the army, from 1786.

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artistic (adj.)

"pertaining to art or artists" in any sense, but especially in the aesthetic sense; also "characterized by conformity with one of the fine arts; displaying excellence of design and execution," 1753, from French artistique, from artiste (see artist). Native artist-like was recorded from 1711; artistly from 1754; artistical from 1798. Related: Artistically.

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artiste (n.)

"one skillful in some art not considered one of the fine arts; one who makes an art of his employment," attested by 1819 in English, from 1804 as a French word in English, from French artiste; an English reborrowing of artist, at first in a foreign context, later used to fill the gap after the sense of artist had become limited toward the visual arts and especially painting.

Artiste: an admirable word (albeit somewhat Frenchified) of late applied, with nice discrimination, to every species of exhibitor, from a rope-dancer down to a mere painter or sculptor. On looking into little Entick (my great authority in these matters), I find we have already the word artist; but with stupid English perversity, we have hitherto used that in a much more restricted sense than its newly-imported rival, which it is becoming the excellent fashion to adopt. ["Paul Pry's Journal of a Residence at Little-Pedlington," Philadelphia, 1836]
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technic (adj.)

1610s, "technical," from Latin technicus, from Greek tekhnikos "of or pertaining to art, made by art," from tekhnē "art, skill, craft" (see techno-). As a noun, "performance method of an art," 1855, a nativization of technique.

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technique (n.)

1817, at first especially in criticism of art and music, from French technique "formal practical details in artistic expression" (18c.), noun use of technique (adj.) "of art, technical," from Greek tekhnikos "pertaining to art," from tekhnē "art, skill, craft in work" (see techno-).

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