Etymology
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slinger (n.)

"soldier armed with a sling," late 14c., agent noun from sling (v.).

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skosh (n.)

"a little bit," Korean War armed forces slang, from Japanese sukoshi "few, little, some."

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armada (n.)

"fleet of warships," 1530s (armado), from Spanish armada "an armed force," from Medieval Latin armata "armed force" (see army). The current form of the English word is from 1590s. The fleet sent by Philip II of Spain against England in 1588 was called the Spanish Armada by 1613, the Invincible Armada by 1632, presumably with more or less of irony.

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army (n.)

late 14c., armee, "armed expedition," from Old French armée "armed troop, armed expedition" (14c.), from Medieval Latin armata "armed force," from Latin armata, fem. of armatus "armed, equipped, in arms," as a noun, "armed men, soldiers," past participle of armare "to arm," literally "act of arming," related to arma "tools, arms" (see arm (n.2)).

Originally used of expeditions on sea or land; the restriction to "land force" is by late 18c. The transferred meaning "host, multitude" is by c. 1500. The meaning "body of men trained and equipped for war" is from 1550s.

The Old English words were here (still preserved in derivatives such as harrier; see harry (v.)), from Proto-Germanic *harjan, from PIE *korio- "people, crowd;" and fierd, with an original sense of "expedition," from Proto-Germanic *farthi-, related to faran "travel" (see fare (v.)). In spite of etymology, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle here generally meant "invading Vikings" and fierd was used for the local militias raised to fight them. Army-ant is from 1863, so called for marching in immense numbers.

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pikeman (n.)

"soldier armed with a pike," by 1560s, from pike (n.1) + man (n.).

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serviceable (adj.)

"ready to do service, willing, diligent in service," early 14c., from Old French servicable, from servise (see service (n.1)). Other early words in a similar sense include servish "obedient, compliant" (c. 1400); serviable "willing to serve, complaisant" (late 14c.); servicious "complacent, obedient" (mid-15c., from Latin servitium). Of things, "beneficial, capable of rendering useful service," late 14c. Related: Serviceably; serviceability.

Edgar: I know thee well: a serviceable villain,
As duteous to the vices of thy mistress
As badness would desire.
["King Lear," IV.vi.]
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metier (n.)

"one's skill, talent, or calling," 1792, from French métier "trade, profession," from Old French mestier "task, affair, service, function, duty," from Gallo-Roman *misterium, from Latin ministerium "office, service," from minister "servant" (see minister (n.)).

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commandeer (v.)

1881, "to seize or force into military service," from Dutch (especially Afrikaans) kommandeeren "to command" (for military service), from French commander "to order" (see command (v.)). General sense "take arbitrary possession of" is from 1900. Related: Commandeered; commandeering.

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musketeer (n.)

"soldier armed with a musket," 1580s, from musket + -eer, or else from French mousquetaire, from mousquette (see musket).

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Shin Bet (n.)

Israeli security service, 1964, from Modern Hebrew shin + bet, names of the initial letters of sherut bitahon (kelali) "(general) security service."

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