Etymology
Advertisement
slinger (n.)
"soldier armed with a sling," late 14c., agent noun from sling (v.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
rifleman (n.)

"man armed with a rifle, one skilled in shooting with a rifle," 1775, from rifle (n.) + man (n.). Formerly also a military designation of a soldier armed with a rifle (when most of the infantry carried muskets).

Related entries & more 
militiaman (n.)

"one who belongs to an organized and armed militia, member of a militia force," 1780, from militia + man (n.).

Related entries & more 
naff (v.)

British slang word with varied senses, not all of them certainly connected; see Partridge, who lists two noun uses: "female pudenda" (c. 1845), which might be back-slang from fan, shortening of fanny (in the British sense); and "nothing," in prostitutes' slang from c. 1940; a verbal use, a euphemism for fuck (v.) in oaths, imprecations, expletives (as in naff off), 1959, "making it slightly less obvious than eff" [Partridge]; and an adjective naff "vulgar, common, despicable," which is said to have been used in 1960s British gay slang for "unlovely" and thence adopted into the jargons of the theater and the armed forces.

Related entries & more 
armada (n.)
"fleet of warships," 1530s (armado), from Spanish armada "an armed force," from Medieval Latin armata "armed force" (see army). Current form of the word is from 1590s. The fleet sent by Philip II of Spain against England in 1588 was being called the Spanish Armada by 1613, the Invincible Armada by 1632.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
army (n.)

late 14c., "armed expedition," from Old French armée "armed troop, armed expedition" (14c.), from Medieval Latin armata "armed force," from Latin armata, fem. of armatus "armed, equipped, in arms," as a noun, "armed men, soldiers," past participle of armare "to arm," literally "act of arming," related to arma "tools, arms" (see arm (n.2)).

Originally used of expeditions on sea or land; restriction to "land force" is by late 18c. Transferred meaning "host, multitude" is c. 1500. Meaning "body of men trained and equipped for war" is from 1550s.

The Old English words were here (still preserved in derivatives such as harrier; see harry (v.)), from Proto-Germanic *harjan, from PIE *korio- "people, crowd;" and fierd, with an original sense of "expedition," from Proto-Germanic *farthi-, related to faran "travel" (see fare (v.)). In spite of etymology, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle here generally meant "invading Vikings" and fierd was used for the local militias raised to fight them. Army-ant is from 1863.

Related entries & more 
musketeer (n.)
"soldier armed with a musket," 1580s, from musket + -eer, or else from French mousquetaire, from mousquette (see musket).
Related entries & more 
eager (adj.)

late 13c., "strenuous, ardent, fierce, angry," from Old French aigre "sour, acid; harsh, bitter, rough; eager greedy; lively, active, forceful," from Vulgar Latin *acrus (source also of Italian agro, Spanish agrio), from Latin acer "keen, sharp, pointed, piercing; acute, ardent, zealous" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce").

Meaning "full of keen desire" (early 14c.) seems to be peculiar to English. The English word kept a secondary meaning of "pungent, sharp-edged" till 19c. (as in Shakespeare's "The bitter clamour of two eager tongues," in "Richard II"). Related: Eagerly; eagerness. Eager beaver "glutton for work" [OED] is from 1943, U.S. armed forces slang.

Related entries & more 
pikeman (n.)

"soldier armed with a pike," by 1560s, from pike (n.1) + man (n.).

Related entries & more 
kinetics (n.)
"science of motion and forces acting on bodies in motion," 1864, from kinetic; see -ics.
Related entries & more 

Page 3