Etymology
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arcade (n.)

1731, "vaulted space" (as arcado from 1640s), via French arcade, which probably is from Italian arcata "arch of a bridge," from arco "arc," from Latin arcus "a bow, arch" (see arc (n.)).

The English word was applied to passages formed by a succession of arches supported on piers or pillars, avenues of trees, and ultimately to any covered avenue (1731), especially one lined with shops (1795) or amusements; hence arcade game (1977).

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matriarch (n.)

"mother or woman who heads a family or tribe," c. 1600, from matri- "mother, woman" + -arch, abstracted from patriarch, ultimately from Greek arkhein "to rule" (see archon).

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zygoma (n.)
"bony arch of the cheek," plural zygomata, 1680s, Modern Latin, from Greek zygoma, from zygon "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). So called because it connects the bones of the face with those of the skull about the ear.
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modish (adj.)

"fashionable, stylish," often with a hint of contempt, 1650s, from mode (n.2) + -ish. "Very common in 17-18 c.; now somewhat arch[aic]." [OED]. Related: Modishly; modishness.

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vault (v.2)
"to form with a vault or arched roof," late 14c., from Old French vaulter, volter, from voute "arch, vaulted roof" (see vault (n.1)). Related: Vaulted; vaulting.
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skelm (n.)
also skellum, "a rascal, scamp, scoundrel," 1610s, from Dutch schelm, from German schelm "rascal, devil, pestilence, etc.," from Old High German scelmo. Used by Dryden, but "Now arch. (except in S.Africa)" [OED].
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fornix (n.)
from 1680s in reference to various arched formations (especially in anatomy), from Latin fornix "arch, vaulted chamber, cellar, vaulted opening," probably an extension, based on appearance, from a source akin to fornus "brick oven of arched or domed shape" (from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm").
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hog (v.)
"to appropriate greedily," 1884, U.S. slang (first attested in "Huck Finn"), from hog (n.). Earlier it meant "Cause to form a horizontal arch" (like the back of a hog), 1798, and "cut a horse's mane short" (so it bristles like a hog's back), 1769. Related: Hogged; hogging.
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ripping (adj.)

1714, "cutting," present-participle adjective from rip (v.). Slang meaning "very fast, rapid" (probably now obsolete) is from 1826; hence the further slang development "excellent, splendid" (1846), marked in OED (1989) as "Now somewhat arch." Related: Rippingly.

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buckle (v.2)

"distort, warp, bend out of shape" 1520s, bokelen "to arch the body," from French boucler "to bulge," from Old French bocler "to bulge," from bocle "boss of a shield" (see buckle (n.)). Meaning "to bend under strong pressure" is from 1590s (figurative from 1640s) . Related: Buckled; buckling.

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