Etymology
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pronunciation (n.)

early 15c., pronunciacioun, "mode in which a word is pronounced," from Old French prononciacion (13c.) and directly from Latin pronuntiationem (nominative pronuntiatio) "act of speaking, utterance, delivery," also "proclamation, public declaration," noun of action from past-participle stem of pronuntiare "announce" (see pronounce). The -t- was restored in the English word 16c.

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counsel (v.)

c. 1300, counseilen, "to give or offer advice, admonish, instruct," from Old French conseiller "to advise, counsel," from Latin consiliari, from consilium "plan, opinion," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + root of calare "to announce, summon" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). Related: Counseled

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predicate (v.)

"declare, assert, affirm," especially as an attribute or quality of something, 1550s, a back formation from predication, or else from Latin praedicatus, past participle of praedicare "proclaim, announce" (see predicate (n.)). Related: Predicated; predicating. Phrase predicated on "founded on, based on," is American English, recorded from 1766.

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decry (v.)

1610s, "to cry down, speak disparagingly of;" 1640s, "clamor against actively and publicly," from French decrier (14c.; Old French descrier "cry out, announce"), from des- "apart" (see dis-) + crier "to cry," from Latin quiritare (see cry (v.)). In English, the sense has been colored by the presumption that de- in this word means "down."

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declarant (n.)

"one who makes a declaration," 1680s, from French déclarant, from Latin declarantem (nominative declarans), present participle of declarare  "make clear, reveal, disclose, announce," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clarare "clarify," from clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)). Especially in law, "one whose admission or statement is sought as evidence."

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enunciate (v.)
1620s, "declare, express," from Latin enunciatus, properly enuntiatus, past participle of enuntiare "speak out, say, express, assert; divulge, disclose, reveal, betray," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + nuntiare "to announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout"). Or perhaps a back-formation from enunciation. Meaning "to articulate, pronounce" is from 1759. Related: Enunciated; enunciating.
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declarative (adj.)

1530s, "making clear or manifest, explanatory," from French déclaratif and directly from Late Latin declarativus, from past-participle stem of Latin declarare "make clear, reveal, disclose, announce," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clarare "clarify," from clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)).

Meaning "making declaration, exhibiting" is from 1620s. The word was used in mid-15c. as a noun meaning "an explanation." Related: Declaratively.

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intimate (adj.)
1630s, "closely acquainted, very familiar," also "inmost, intrinsic," from Late Latin intimatus, past participle of intimare "make known, announce, impress," from Latin intimus "inmost, innermost, deepest" (adj.), also used figuratively, of affections, feelings, as a noun, "close friend;" superlative of in "in" (from PIE root *en "in"). Intimate (adj.) used euphemistically in reference to women's underwear from 1904. Related: Intimately.
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descry (v.1)

c. 1300, descriven, "to see, discern," probably from Old French descrier "publish, proclaim, announce" (Modern French décrier), from Latin describere "to write down, copy" (see describe). From mid-14c. as "detect, find out, discover" (something concealed), also "discover by vision, get sight of." Since early 15c. the word has been more or less confused with descry (v.2). Related: Descried; descrying.

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counsel (n.)

c. 1200, "advice or instruction given;" c. 1300, "mutual advising or interchange of opinions, consultation," from Old French counseil "advice, counsel; deliberation, thought" (10c.), from Latin consilium "plan, opinion," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + root of calare "to announce, summon" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). As a synonym for "lawyer, one who gives legal counsel," attested late 14c.

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