Etymology
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anemia (n.)
"deficiency of blood in a living body," alternative (chiefly U.S.) spelling of anaemia (q.v.); also see æ (1). As a genus of plants, Modern Latin, from Greek aneimon "unclad," from an- "without" (see an- (1)) + eima "a dress, garment" (see wear (v.)).
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anhydrous (adj.)
"containing no water," 1809, a modern coinage from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + hydor "water" (from PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet") + -ous. Greek did have anhydros "waterless," used of arid lands or corpses that had not been given proper funeral rites.
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amoebaean (adj.)
also amoebean, "alternating, answering alternately," 1650s, from Greek amoibe "change, alteration; exchange" (see amoeba) + -an.
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Sisyphean (adj.)
"pertaining to or resembling the unceasingly recurring and fruitless labors of Sisyphus," 1630s, from Sisyphus + -an. Earlier Sisyphian (1590s).
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avian (adj.)

"resembling or pertaining to birds," 1861, from Latin avis "bird" (from PIE root *awi- "bird") + -an.

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cetacean (n.)

1836, from Cetacea, name of the order of marine mammals, + -an. As an adjective, "pertaining to the whale," from 1839.

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anonymous (adj.)

c. 1600, "without a name;" 1670s, "published under no name, of unknown authorship," from Late Latin anonymus, from Greek anonymos "without a name," from an- "without" (see an- (1)) + onyma, Æolic dialectal form of onoma "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name").

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Bacchanalian (adj.)
1560s, "characterized by intemperate drinking;" see Bacchanalia + -an. From 1620s as "pertaining to Bacchanals." As a noun from 1610s, "participant in the Bacchanalia."
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Swabian 
1785; see Swabia + -an. The Swabian emperors (1138-1254) were so called because the founder of the line was duke of Swabia.
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antiquarian (n.)
"one who studies or is fond of antiquities, one versed in knowledge of ancient things," c. 1600, with -an + Latin antiquarius "pertaining to antiquity," from antiquus "ancient, aged, venerable" (see antique (adj.)). In later use more specifically "collector of antiquities; dealer in old books, coins, objects of art, etc." As an adjective, "pertaining to antiquaries," from 1771. Compare antiquary.
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