Etymology
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amplification (n.)

1540s, "enlargement" in any dimension, from Latin amplificationem (nominative amplificatio) "a widening, extending," noun of action from past-participle stem of amplificare "to enlarge, broaden, increase," from amplus "large" (see ample) + combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Originally in English often of rhetorical devices; meaning "enlargement of sound by electrical technology" is from 1915.

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ampersand (n.)

1797, contraction of and per se and, meaning "(the character) '&' by itself is 'and' " (a hybrid phrase, partly in Latin, partly in English). An earlier form of it was colloquial ampassy (1706). The distinction is to avoid confusion with & in such formations as &c., a once common way of writing etc. (the et in et cetera is Latin for "and"). The letters a, I, and o also formerly (15c.-16c.) were written a per se, etc., especially when standing alone as words.

The symbol is based on the Latin word et "and," and comes from an old Roman system of shorthand signs (ligatures) attested in Pompeiian graffiti, and not (as sometimes stated) from the Tironian Notes, which was a different form of shorthand, probably invented by Cicero's companion Marcus Tullius Tiro, which used a different symbol, something like a reversed capital gamma, to indicate et. This Tironian symbol was maintained by some medieval scribes, including Anglo-Saxon chroniclers, who sprinkled their works with a symbol like a numeral 7 to indicate the word and.

In old schoolbooks the ampersand was printed at the end of the alphabet and thus by 1880s the word ampersand had acquired a slang sense of "posterior, rear end, hindquarters."

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Amphictyonic (adj.)
in reference to one of several ancient Greek confederations of neighboring states, 1753, probably via French, from Greek amphiktionikos, from amphiktiones "neighbors," literally "they that dwell round about," from amphi "on both sides, all around" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") + second element related to ktizein "to create, found," ktoina "habitation, township," from PIE *kti-, metathesized form of root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home."

The most famous was that of Delphi. Madison and other U.S. Founders devoted close study to it. Shaftesbury has amphictyonian (1711).
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amphigory (n.)
"burlesque nonsense writing or verse," 1809, from French amphigouri (18c.), which is of unknown origin, perhaps itself a nonsense word, though the first element seems to suggest Greek amphi (see amphi-). The second sometimes is said to be Greek gyros "circle," making the whole thus "circle on both sides," or it may be from Greek -agoria "speech" (as in allegory, category). Related: Amphigoric.
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Amphiscians (n.)
1620s, from Medieval Latin Amphiscii, from Greek amphiskioi "inhabitants of the tropics," literally "throwing a shadow both ways," from amphi "on both sides" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") + skia "shadow, shade" (see Ascians). Inhabitants of torrid zones, so called because they are "people whose shadow is sometimes to the North, and sometimes to the South" [Cockerham, 1623] depending on the sun being below or above the equator. Compare Ascians.
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amphora (n.)
early 14c., "two-handled vessel for holding wine, oil, etc.," from Latin amphora from Greek amphoreus "an amphora, jar, urn," contraction of amphiphoreus, literally "two-handled," from amphi "on both sides" (see amphi-) + phoreus "bearer," from pherein "to bear," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry."

Decorative amphorae were used as ornaments and given as prizes at some public games. Also a liquid measure in the ancient world, in Greece equal to 9 gallons, in Rome to 6 gallons, 7 pints. Related: Amphoral; amphoric.
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amplify (v.)
early 15c., "to enlarge, expand, increase," from Old French amplifier (15c.), from Latin amplificare "to enlarge," from amplus "large" (see ample) + combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Meaning "augment in volume or amount" is from 1570s. Restriction of use to sound seems to have emerged from c. 1915 in reference to radio technology.
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ampoule (n.)
"small bottle or flask," especially one used for holy liquids, c. 1200, from Old French ampole "flask, vial," from Latin ampulla "small globular flask or bottle," which is of uncertain origin, perhaps a contracted form of amphora. Superseded in English by the form ampulla and later ampul.
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ampul (n.)
1907, "sealed container holding a dose of medicine," from French ampul (1886), from Latin ampulla "flask, vial" (see ampoule). A modern borrowing of the word represented by Middle English ampoule. Related: Ampullaceous.
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ampulla (n.)
type of globular ancient Roman bottle with a narrow neck, late 14c., from Latin ampulla (see ampoule, which is the same word come up through French).
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