Etymology
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total (n.)
"whole amount, sum," 1550s, from total (adj.).
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monetize (v.)

"put into circulation as money," 1856, from Latin moneta "money" (see money (n.) ) + -ize. Related: Monetized; monetizing.

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pecunious (adj.)

"wealthy, rich, full of money," late 14c., from Old French pecunios and directly from Latin pecuniosus "abounding in money," from pecunia "money" (see pecuniary). Related: Pecuniously; pecuniousness.

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monetary (adj.)

1802, "pertaining to coinage or currency;" 1860, "pertaining to money;" from Late Latin monetarius "pertaining to money," originally "of a mint," from Latin moneta "mint; coinage" (see money (n.)). Related: Monetarily.

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whole (n.)
"entire body or company; the full amount," late 14c., from whole (adj.).
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disburse (v.)

1520s, disbourse, "pay out or expend (money," from Old French desbourser "extract (money) from a purse, spend (money)" (13c., Modern French débourser), from des- (see dis-) + bourse "purse" (see bursar). Related: Disbursed; disbursing.

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monies (n.)

"sums of money," irregular plural of money that emerged mid-19c. in rivalry to earlier moneys (c. 1300).

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preponderous (adj.)

"exceeding in quantity or amount," 1700, from preponderate + -ous. Related: Preponderously.

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monetization (n.)

"act or process of giving something the character of money or coining it as money," 1855; see monetize + noun ending -ation.

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sock (v.2)
"to stash (money) away as savings," 1942, American English, from the notion of hiding one's money in a sock (see sock (n.1)).
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