Etymology
Advertisement
passionate (adj.)

early 15c., "angry; emotional, subject to emotions, exhibiting or expressing passion in any sense," from Medieval Latin passionatus "affected with passion," from Latin passio (genitive passionis) "suffering, enduring" (see passion). Specific sense of "amorous" is attested from 1580s. Related: Passionately; passionateness. Middle English had also passional "pertaining to the feelings" (mid-15c., from Medieval Latin passionalis).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
flirtation (n.)

"amorous trifling; giddy behavior," 1718, noun of action from flirt (v.) as though Latin. The date, alas, gives the lie to Chesterfield's charming story of its coinage (in The World, Dec. 5, 1754) but not his refinement of the definition: "[F]lirtation is short of coquetry, and intimates only the first hints of approximation, which subsequent coquetry may reduce to those preliminary articles, that commonly end in a definitive treaty."

Related entries & more 
ramble (v.)

mid-15c., ramblen, "to wander, roam about in a leisurely manner," perhaps frequentative of romen "to walk, go" (see roam), perhaps via romblen (late 14c.) "to ramble." The vowel change is perhaps by influence of Middle Dutch rammelen, a derivative of rammen "copulate," "used of the night wanderings of the amorous cat" [Weekley], or the Middle English word might be from the Dutch one. Meaning "to talk or write incoherently" is from 1630s. Related: Rambled; rambling.

Related entries & more 
wile (n.)

late Old English, wil "stratagem, trick, sly artifice," perhaps from Old North French *wile (Old French guile), or directly from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse vel "trick, craft, fraud," vela "defraud"). Perhaps ultimately related to Old English wicca "wizard" (see Wicca). Lighter sense of "amorous or playful trick" is from c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
sideways (adv.)

1570s, "from one side;" 1590s, "presenting the side" (instead of the face); 1610s, "toward one side;" from side (n.) + way (n.), with adverbial genitive. The form sideway is attested from 1610s. An earlier adverb was sideward, sidewards (early 15c.) "tending toward one side." To look sideways (at) is recorded from 1844 as "cast amorous glances," by 1860 as "cast scornful glances."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dally (v.)

c. 1300, dalien, "to speak seriously, commune;" late 14c., "to talk intimately, converse politely," possibly from Anglo-French dalier "to amuse oneself," Old French dalier, dailer, which is of uncertain origin. Sense of "waste time" in any manner emerged by late 14c.; that of "to play, sport, frolic; flirt, engage in amorous exchanges" is from mid-15c. Meaning "to linger, loiter, delay (intransitive)" is from 1530s. Related: Dallied; dallying.

Related entries & more 
goo-goo (adj.)

"amorous," 1900, perhaps connected with goggle, because the earliest reference is in goo-goo eyes. Use in reference to politics is from 1890s and seems to be a shortening of Good Government as the name of a movement to clean up municipal corruption in Boston, New York, etc. It soon was extended to mean "naive political reformer." Goo-goo as imitative of baby-talk is from 1863.

Related entries & more 
slap (n.)

mid-15c., "a smart blow," especially with the open hand or something flat, probably of imitative origin, similar to Low German slappe, German Schlappe.

The figurative meaning "an insult, a reprimand" is attested from 1736. Slap-happy (1936) originally meant "punch-drunk." Slap on the wrist "very mild punishment" dates from 1914; slap in the face figuratively for "an insult" is by 1861. Colloquial slap and tickle "light amorous play" is by 1928.

Related entries & more 
pass (n.2)

"written permission to pass into, or through, a place," 1590s, from pass (v.). Sense of "ticket for a free ride or admission" is by 1838. In cards, "the act of declining to make a bid," by 1923 in bridge. Colloquial make a pass "offer an amorous advance" is recorded by 1928, perhaps from a sporting sense (football, fencing). Phrase come to pass "be carried out or accomplished" (late 15c.) uses the word with a sense of "completion, accomplishment."

Related entries & more 
coquet (n.)

"amorous, flirtatious person, one who seeks to be romantically attractive out of vanity," 1690s, originally of both sexes (as it was in French), from French coquet "a beau," literally "a little cock" (17c.), diminutive of coq "cock" (see cock (n.1)). A figurative reference to its strut or its lust. The distinction from fem. coquette began c. 1700, and use of the earlier word in reference to males has since faded. As a verb, "to act the lover," from 1701. Related: Coqueting.

Related entries & more 

Page 3