Etymology
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Amerind (n.)

1899, coined by Maj. John Wesley Powell at the Bureau of American Ethnology, where he was director, from American + Indian.

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grouper (n.)

type of fish, 1690s, from Portuguese garupa, of unknown origin, probably from a South American Indian language, perhaps Tupi.

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hogan (n.)

Navaho Indian dwelling, 1871, American English, from Athapaskan (Navaho) hoghan "dwelling, house."

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catalpa (n.)

type of large-leaved North American tree with winged seeds, c. 1740, from an American Indian language of the Carolinas, perhaps Creek (Muskogean) /katalpa/, literally "head-wing."

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dat 

representing the pronunciation of that in West Indian, Irish, or African-American vernacular speech, from 1680s.

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gunman (n.)

1620s, from gun (n.) + man (n.). In early American English use, especially of Indian warriors.

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corn-pone (n.)

"Indian-corn bread made with milk and eggs and baked in a pan," 1848, American English, from corn (n.1) + pone (n.).

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tamale (n.)

1856, false singular from tamales (1690s), from American Spanish tamales, plural of tamal, from Nahuatl tamal, tamalli, a food made of Indian corn and meat.

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corn-husking (n.)

"social meeting of friends and neighbors at a farmer's barn to assist in husking of the newly harvested Indian corn," 1818, American English, from corn (n.1) + husk (v.). Corn-husker is from 1849.

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gila monster (n.)

"venomous lizard of the American southwest" (Heloderma suspectum), 1877, American English, from Gila River, which runs through its habitat in Arizona. The river name probably is from an Indian language, but it is unknown now which one, or what the word meant in it.

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