Etymology
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dreamland (n.)

"land or region seen in dreams," hence "the land of fancy or imagination," 1827, from dream (n.) + land (n.).

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oneiromancy (n.)

"divination through dreams," 1650s; see oneiro- "dream" + -mancy "divination by means of." Greek had oneiromantis "an interpreter of dreams." Related: oneiromantic.

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powwow (n.)

also pow-wow, 1620s, "priest, conjurer, sorcerer among the North American natives," from a southern New England Algonquian language (probably Narragansett) powwaw "shaman, medicine man, Indian priest," from a verb meaning "to use divination, to dream," from Proto-Algonquian *pawe:wa "he dreams, one who dreams."

The meaning "magical ceremony among North American Indians" is recorded from 1660s. The general sense of "council, conference, meeting," especially if convivial, is recorded by 1812. Verb sense of "to confer, discuss, hold a consultation, deliberate over events" is attested from 1780.

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Xanadu 

Mongol city founded by Kublai Khan, 1620s, Englished form of Shang-tu. Sense of "dream place of magnificence and luxury" derives from Coleridge's poem (1816).

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dreamless (adj.)

"free from dreams," c. 1600, from dream (n.) + -less. Old English dreamleas meant "joyless." Related: Dreamlessly; dreamlessness. Dreamful is recorded from 1550s.

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dreamer (n.)

early 14c., "one who dreams," agent noun from dream (v.). Meaning "idler, daydreamer" emerged by late 14c. Old English dreamere meant "musician."

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oneirocritic (n.)

"a judge or interpreter of dreams," 1650s from Greek oneirokritikos "of or pertaining to the interpretation of dreams," from oneirokritēs "interpreter of dreams," from oneiros "a dream" (see oneiro-) + kritēs "discerner, judge" (see critic).

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raddle (v.)

"color coarsely with red or rouge," 1630s, from raddle (n.) "red ochre used as paint, layer of red pigment" (mid-14c.), fromrad, a variant of red. Related: Raddled, raddling.

                     As it were to dream of
morticians' daughters raddled but amorous
[Pound, from Canto LXXIV]
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swagger (v.)

1580s, "to strut in a defiant or insolent manner;" earliest recorded usages are in Shakespeare ("Midsummer Night's Dream," "2 Henry IV," "King Lear"), probably a frequentative form of swag (v.) "to sway." Meaning "to boast or brag" is from 1590s. Related: Swaggered; swaggering. The noun is attested from 1725.

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significance (n.)

c. 1400, significaunce, "meaning" (of an omen, dream, etc.), from Old French significance or directly from Latin significantia "meaning, force, energy," from significans, present participle of significare "to mean, import, signify" (see signify).

From mid-15c. as "verbal meaning;" the sense of "importance" is from 1725. The earlier word was signifiance "sign, symbol, portent, meaning" (mid-13c.). Significancy (1590s) was the more common form 17c.-18c.

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